Hi Robert – I know I’ve read that more than a few times in some of the main stream aromatherapy books and think I was told that in my aromatherapy classes – about the 2% thing. So, it is a perception that I myself also have and have, therefore, spent long hours trying to determine if my sources are selling me what they say they are and who my sources should be – long hours and dollars spent to attend conferences to rub elbows with those who should know. However, at that time in 2006, organic essential oils were not readily or at all available. I have also read and have been told by those who should know, that just because an oil is certified organic, there is still no guarantee that said essential oil is not adulterated or for that matter really organic. The argument that I was given was that no one stays around to make sure that the material actually placed into the still was the same that was grown in the organic soil. We live in a world of distrust and for good reason as we look around at the greed in high places. I know this doesn’t address your issues about your article but was and always will be interested in any discussion concerning what constitutes an unadulterated oil. That being said, I would think there are certain things to consider when purchasing an oil and the chances it may or may not be adulterated. Some oils are naturally inexpensive and there would be nothing gained by adulterating them. If you look at how many acres of a particular oil are said to have been grown for a particular year and for that same year there was a great more essential oil sold than could have been produced – then you know you probably have an issue. I know that you know far more about this issue than I do, but I would like to see more discussion concerning what things would throw up a red flag when purchasing an oil from a particular supplier. The internet is now so absolutely full of people selling essential oils and copying and pasting the same old information that it is a bit overwhelming. My concern is the same as other clinical aromatherapists and that is that people will try a particular oil, find that it doesn’t work because it is either adulterated or the person selling the oil really doesn’t have a clue which oil or chemotype should be used for a particular purpose, so the client then assumes that any and all claims made by the aromatherapy industry are false or vastly overstated. This is true in research studies that have been done as well. Is there an answer? I would like to see an article by someone as knowledgeable as yourself that gives you a list of possible red flags and things to consider when looking for suppliers, particularly bulk suppliers.
I’ve also been plagued with terrible leg cramps for about 3 years now. So bad at times i couldn’t go up or down steps without cramping. They started like yours at night while I was trying to sleep. They would wake me from a sound sleep with excruciating pain and I couldn’t even move to get out of bed to try to relieve them. Drs could not give me any help they only prescribed muscle relaxers which I didn’t take.

The first thing to look for to determine essential oil authenticity is that each oil is identified with the plant’s scientific or botanical name, and in appropriate cases, the chemotype. A chemotype is when the same plant, e.g. rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), will have a different chemical profile based on where it is grown. Only some plants have chemotypes. Country of plant origin, extraction process used, and either a distillation or expiration date are also important.


For some years now I have been applying several drops each of undiluted pure essential oils patchouli, ylang ylang, sandalwood and cedarwood to my neck and throat after a shower, and the fragrance is wonderful, but as a bonus this same fragrance comes up from the toilet bowl every time I do a dump. To confirm I wasn’t imagining it, the first time it happened I smelt the loo paper after the first wipe and there was the fragrance of all those essential oils. Why is this, and has anyone else had the same experience ? I must be one of the very few people in the world who can say that not only does their shit not stink, but that it is exotically perfumed !
Plus, I don’t care how wonderful an EO is, I don’t think a certain combo is going to make someone “Thankful” or give them “Couraqe.” Those are personality traits, not a response to treatment. Seems a bit hokey to me. I just gave her the catalog back and didn’t say much. The MLM system is designed to make people antagonize their friends into feeling obligated to purchase stuff.
I wish that the essential oil market was more heavily regulated, however, this is not the case.  Many of the "essential oils" and plant oils sold on Amazon and other sites are synthetic,  and it is up to the consumer to do their homework and make sure to source from reputable companies that can provide paperwork and lab testing to back up their products.  It is up to companies to do their homework as well—and to be transparent with their customers.  A good rule of thumb is to ask companies to provide Certificates of Analysis and GC Reports when you order, any reputable essential oil supplier will be able to provide those.  
Examples of these types of essence include:  Cajeput (White Tea Tree), Cedar Leaf, Cinnamon Leaf, Eucalyptus Blue Gum, Eucalyptus Blue Mallee, Eucalyptus (Mint), True Eucalyptus, Laurel Leaf (pictured), Tea Tree, Mandarin Petitgrain,  Lime Petitgrain, Orange Petitgrain, Manuka, Magnolia Leaf, Niaouli, Nerolina, Rosalina, Purple Sage and White Sage.

Bath: Avoid dripping your essential oil directly into the bath water; you always want to mix it first with a natural emulsifier like honey, milk, a carrier oil, or even sea salt. Doing this will help emulsify and disperse the essential oils into the water. If you don’t do this, the oils will simply sit on the surface of the water and come into direct contact with your skin, possibly causing burns and dermal toxicity.
Much of my frustration comes from mlm companies proclaiming that THEIR oils are the best and that therapeutic grade means everything. Because there are not alot of distilleries around the world, many of us are getting our oils from the exact same places. Yet MLM’s tend to jack their prices up to over double in some cases, and use their claims as being the best to fortify the price increase. I do feel for consumers though. It is hard to know who to trust. I know of quite a few wonderful companies out there, besides mine that have wonderful, well priced oils. Yes, as you said, you will also pay for quality, but you need to trust who that supplier is. MLM’s will always have higher prices because of their structure. While that bothers me, it is their exclusivity that bothers me more, especially when I know we are sourcing from the same places.
It's not an instant favorite (unlike Artemisia pallens and Inula graveolens), although I typically grow to like EO's once my body has had a chance to think them over and assimilate the new information. I gave it 5 stars for three reasons: It is unbelievably intense and lasting, which is how it is described around the web. It smells nothing like valerian, which I've heard people complaining gets substituted for the more-expensive vetiver. I've smelled a lot of valerian, and I just don't detect any of that here, so I'd say this hasn't been cut with anything. And despite washing with (unscented) soap and rinsing with isopropyl alcohol, the fragrance has not changed, it has only gotten a little weaker--I can't stand scents that change when they are watered down.

The oil of frankincense is an ancient remedy for infection, and recently its ability to fight cancer and support the immune system in general has begun to be studied rigorously, particularly in Europe. Scientists believe the main element in frankincense which fights cancer is a compound known as acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, or AKBA for short. There have been many documented cases of frankincense curing cancer labeled as "incurable" by mainstream medicine, such as ovarian cancer and brain cancer. Research indicates it can prevent uterine cancer or help heal it.
It’s very important to keep in mind that the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates essential oils mainly as cosmetics, NOT as therapeutic supplements, herbs or medications. So if you come across an essential oil company or salesperson who claims their oils can cure certain diseases or mental illnesses, they are violating federal law and can be prosecuted and fined by the US government.
This is the first time I've smelled this oil. I recall someone in a bookstore telling me once that this was the smell they used in that store but this oil does not smell like that too me. Perhaps it's not the exact oil as there seems to be 3 variations that I've read so far. But none the less it does not stink or have a heavy soap smell like most oils and I am happy to add it to mu collection. It seems like a very thin oil which will come in handy. It also arrived quickly and packaged well so I do recommend this seller. As to the actual quality of the oil, I have no clue as I'm no expert but happy to have it and look forward to using it more...

One recent study of 300 patients found that those who breathed a mixture of ginger, spearmint, peppermint, and cardamom had much less nausea after surgery. Other research shows that lavender oil can lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and inhaling lemongrass aroma before a stressful event can prevent anxiety. Studies also show that tea tree and oregano oils can fight microbes, making them popular treatments for dandruff and toe fungus. Others can be used as an anti-inflammatory.
I use Piping Rock EO and I love them. They do everything that any other brand does advice tried the more expensive ones like DoTerra and I find that Piping Rock is a great product with great results and one that I can easily afford. Sorry but those marketing companies are just about money. I love Essential Oils and how they have helped my family in so many ways with pain and other ailments. I also do not trust anyone who says to ingest the oils and unless a professional medical expert says it’s ok I think you are asking for trouble. You don’t have to pay ridiculous prices for good 100% pure Essential Oils.

An essential oil is a concentrated, volatile, aromatic liquid that is obtained from the fruits, seeds, flowers, bark, stems, roots, leaves or other parts of a plant. There are estimated to be 10,000 aromatic plants (ie that contain essential oils) on Earth, and about 500 of these are processed commercially for essential oil extraction. These oils have been used for centuries for both their healing and aromatic benefits. Plant Therapy offers over 100 of these essential oils.
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