Tea tree oil! I did not even think of this as an essential oil product. It has been a staple of my bathroom cabinet for years as a shampoo additive. One or two drops in the bottle of shampoo and those pesky head lice (that I frequently encounter in elementary school settings) are goners! I have waist length hair, and after contracting lice a couple of times, I asked my primary physician what I could do besides keep my hair up (a possibility) or cutting it short (not happening).
For the last 15-20 years, essential oil therapy’s demand for clean, high quality oils has been stimulated by scientific analysis and research. The community has made some impact on the production and distribution practices of the worldwide essential oil industry. Everyone using essential oils in therapies as integrative medicine are creating a niche market for a new generation of essential oils. Analysis by and for therapists will continue to have positive influence on essential oil purity, quality, discovery and treatment.
There were only a few things I was unhappy with, but they weren't important enough to lower my rating. First, I had to use a lot of cinnamon bark oil, and I mean A LOT, in my diffuser for it to really be noticeable. It's only been two weeks, and I'm three-fourths of the way through a 30 ml bottle! As others have mentioned, the oil comes out of the droppers really fast. You have to be extra careful. Lastly, I don't care for the residue that the cinnamon bark oil leaves in my diffuser. It has turned the inside a yellow, goopy mess, and I dripped the oil onto the front of my diffuser and it completely erased the ink to all of the words and numbers!
In the holistic use of essential oils, the focus is on bringing the body back into natural balance and harmony. Disease is seen as merely an outward symptom of a deeper, underlying imbalance in the body, mind and spirit. Holistic medicine sees the body as a self-healing mechanism. The body is capable of healing itself of disease by bringing the whole person back into balance. Therefore, the holistic use of therapeutic essential oils focuses on restoring balance in the body, mind and spirit. Success is gauged equally on the relief of symptoms and the improvement of overall wellness, vitality and happiness.
I really like DoTerra brand essential oils. I have many of them and find them high quality. All essential oils that are sold are in business. Whether it’s MLM or not. I don’t have a problem with that at all (but maybe it’s just me). Young Living was once considered by many to be the “best” but now that DoTerra’s been on the market (I don’t know, maybe five years or so?) they have competition. Apparently people from Young Living (I’m not sure if that’s the name) broke away and started DoTerra. In any case, if it’s purity and therapeutic grade I personally think both are good companies. Some like DoTerra more so that’s what got me started on them.
I just wanted to let everyone know I get my Now brand EO’s at iHerb.com. You can read the reviews of the different essential oils before you buy. They even have a rewards program at their site. They have low shipping costs of $4.99 and shipping is always free with a $20 plus order (on everything not just oils). If you are a first time customer you can use my code at checkout –>HIW400 <– and you will get $5 off your first order http://www.iHerb.com
One of my biggest frustrations of late has been a MLM company, I won’t name names and start a whole “thing”, but they state that they have a patent on “certified therapeutic grade”. In actuality, if you research the information, the only thing that is patented, is the logo that states “certified therapeutic grade”. It has nothing to do with the actual product, just the advertising.

Susie, yes, I have seen most of the Do Terra essential oils, and yes, it’s almost all hype. There are many suppliers to the aromatherapy community, who provide essential oils that are at least as good as Do Terra, and often cost less because they don’t have the whole multi-level marketing structure to finance. I think it’s very sad that the MLM companies find it necessary to resort to negative marketing in order to sell their essential oils.


“Peppermint is an interesting plant in that it yields more oil than most others. As such, large farms and distilleries extract a bunch of oil from the peppermint plant.  Smaller farms do a first distillation of peppermint that they sell to oils companies for the highest price. The peppermint is then re-distilled at a higher pressure and higher temperature for a 2nd distill, and the resulting oil is sold for less money to soap companies, and the like, that want a lower cost oil, but still desire a slightly “herby” smell. The plant is then re-distilled one more time at a yet higher temperature and pressure for a 3rd distill, which is sold to companies wanting the candy-cane smelling oil.”

research, research, research. Some oils are labeled as Generally Regarded as Safe for ingestion. Get a copy of Higley’s book ” Reference Guide to Essential Oils ” and other guides on how to use your oils. I am not a fan but some people swear by it. The books and research will help you know what you can and cannot ingest, how it is recommended that you ingest it, and so on. Do not let the naysayers frighten you. Learn all you can and use facts to make your decisions. I use EOs daily but I prefer them topically and aromatically. You need to decide for yourself what ways your EOs best work for you.
This is something that should be readily available. For example, the company Aromatics International lists their oil data right on the respective product pages. Most often, you won't often find this posted on websites, but upon request, you should be able to receive it. According to Aromatics, "Gas Chromatography (GC) is a method of separating the volatile compounds in essential oils into individual components and produces a linear graph that charts these components. Mass Spectrometry (MS) identifies each of these components and their percentages. This process is used to identify any adulteration of the essential oil tested. The precise breakdown of the chemical components in individual oils given to us by GC/MS reports are important as the therapeutic benefits and safety issues of essential oils are, in large part, determined by their chemical makeup." (Source)

Infants, toddlers, and young children are more sensitive to the potency of essential oils and safe dilutions generally range from 0.5 - 2.5% depending on the condition. Certain essential oils should either be avoided, used in highly diluted form under the guidance of a knowledgeable professional, or included as a minor percentage in a professionally-formulated essential oil blend. For example, special caution should be exercised with potentially toxic essential oils such as Birch and Wintergreen which are both high in methyl salicylate, Eucalyptus which is high in 1,8 cineole and Peppermint which is high in menthol. Elderly clients may have more skin sensitivities so a reduced concentration/dilution may be indicated.
So, what’s your take on companies like Young Living Oil, which basically give me the vibe of “our oil is the only true and pure one out there”. I’m not sold on the idea, and don’t know that I’ll be purchasing anything other than their Thieves blend, when it comes to EOs for my soaps, lotions, and salves. I know you’re mainly addressing aromatherapy and massage here, but would the same principles apply to homemade healthcare products, as well?
A few drops of lavender essential oil has many properties for body and mind. Lavender essential oil is gentle enough to be applied directly on the skin and is commonly used by massage therapists and naturopaths. Also, lavender essential oil provides beneficial properties for dry and sensitive skin, has soothing properties that help reduce stress and has calming effects that help induce sleep.
I’m totally new to thr essential oil world. All I’d heard is Young Living is the only pure one and the only way to go. I was skeptical and I don’t know why. Have started reading and now I’m even more confised that when I started lol! Who do/can I trust. It’s hard to trust some of these big companies out there cause I feel they will tell you anything to sell you something. I wish we lived in a world of mom and pop places where u knew and trusted the person you bought from. Sigh….

Shannon, not all essential oils are created equal. Zija International has just launched its patented process of AMÉO Essential Oils product division. In particular their Peppermint Essential Oils is a powerful, distinct oil that immediately ignites the senses. Once inhaled or consumed, it goes right to work stimulating the mind and body. Peppermint oil is used aromatically, topically and internally to aid in digestive health, relieve stress and freshen breath. Massaging with the oil can help relieve skin redness and irritations. As far as usage is concerned AMÉO Peppermint oil is ATIDS based on the following key. A: AROMATICALLY – oils can be inhaled or diffused in the air, T: TOPICALLY – Oils can be applied to skin. Some oils require dilution with a carrier oil, I: INTERNALLY – Oils can be taken internally in food, beverages, or an Améo Veggie Cap, N: NEAT – Oil requires no dilution, D: DILUTE – Oil requires dilution with a carrier oil such as Améo Fractionated Coconut Oil, S: SENSITIVE SKIN – Oils should be used with caution on delicate skin; dilute with carrier oil, P: PHOTOSENSITIVITY – Oils require avoidance of direct sunlight or UV rays for at least 12 hours Member # 2424832


The oils from Marshalls you mentioned stated they are for aromatherapy. These are fragrance oils and probably NO T pure. That’s why they are so much cheaper 🙂 and they are just for enjoying the scent vs. therapeutic benefits. I would not recommend applying them to your skin in any way but the DoTerra oils you bought can be applied once mixed with coconut oil (fractionated will not harden in cool temps), sweet almond oil, argan oil or even olive oil. Any oil you choose should be labeled organic of course

Not only is there no evidence that any essential oil can help with vision problems, age-related or otherwise, but placing any essential oil “in the eye” is extremely dangerous advice. Almost any undiluted essential oil coming into contact with the ocular membranes will be corrosive, possibly causing scarring of the cornea, and certainly causing significant pain.
The oils are steam-distilled or mechanically pressed from flowers, trees, shrubs, fruit, roots, rinds, resins and herbs. Each plant's essential oil has a different chemical composition that affects how it smells, how it is absorbed, and how it is used by the body. Even the essential oils from different varieties of the same species may have different chemical compositions, and can vary when the same plants are grown or harvested in different ways, or in different locations.
Many essential oils affect the skin and mucous membranes in ways that are valuable or harmful. Many essential oils, particularly tea tree oil, may cause contact dermatitis.[19][20][21][22] They are used in antiseptics and liniments in particular. Typically, they produce rubefacient irritation at first and then counterirritant numbness. Turpentine oil and camphor are two typical examples of oils that cause such effects. Menthol and some others produce a feeling of cold followed by a sense of burning. This is caused by its effect on heat-sensing nerve endings. Some essential oils, such as clove oil or eugenol, were popular for many hundred years in dentistry as antiseptics and local anesthetics.
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