One example of oil that shows some evidence of effectiveness is tea tree oil, which may be an effective treatment for acne, according to the NIH. In one clinical trial, researchers compared gel containing tea tree oil to a benzoyl peroxide product, and found that the benzoyl peroxide worked slightly better but that the tea tree oil had fewer side effects, according to the NIH.
Floracopeia is another small, independently-owned company with very ethical roots. Started in 2004 in Grass Valley, CA by David and Sara Crow, Floracopeia is our second-best essential oil company. Like Stillpoint, they have strong personal relationships with their distillers; they will even get their hands dirty as they help harvest the plants for extraction when they visit.
Yes, of course ! Let's make something clear though - "Therapeutic Grade" and "Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade" (CPTG) are creative marketing terms employed by some companies to create a certain perception in the minds of unsuspecting consumers. There is no independent autonomous organization that either defines 'Therapeutic Grade' or certifies an essential oil as ‘Therapeutic Grade’. We could very easily label our products as "Certified Ultra Therapeutic Grade", but that again begs the question as to what is the definition of 'Ultra' versus 'Regular' and who actually 'Certified' it ? We do not believe in employing creative marketing terms to attract customers and rather let our quality and integrity speak for itself. 
“If you want to make a difference to people who are being fed a bunch a garbage by a narcissistic EO messiah…”, it makes me question whether the negative things you say about Young Living and the quality of their oils has any true basis, or if you have unresolved anger over your former relationship with Young Living which leads to your bashing the company and their products.
Chemical constituents of Boswellia sacra essential oil fractions were dependent on duration and temperature of hydrodistillation. For example, when essential oils collected from 0–2 h (Fraction I), 8–10 h (Fraction II), and 11–12 h (Fraction III) at 78°C were compared, longer distillation produced higher percentages of sesquiterpenes, between alpha-copaene and caryophyllene oxide (Table? 1). All three fractions were primarily composed of monoterpenes (82.77-90.67%), including alpha-thujene, beta-pinene, and myrcene. Among the monoterpenes, alpha-pinene was the major compound present in all essential oil fractions, ranging from 65.49% to 78.45%. As anticipated, the abundance of alpha-pinene decreased with longer and higher temperature distillation due to its highly volatile nature. Compounds such as borneol, dimethyl ether orcinol, allo-aromadendrene, gamma-cadinene, and caryophyllene oxide were only present in Fraction III essential oil…

Hi, I was wondering if anybody knows where I can get Korres organic essential oils. I bought a lavender and a geranium last year on vacation in Greece but it seems that they’re only sold there. I can’t find them anywhere on the internet which seems really odd. The quality was amazing and I really want to try the others and restock on the lavender and geranium. Please help!


This isn’t a list of oils specifically, but they do have an up-to-date list of endangered plants http://www.unitedplantsavers.org/ This company is started by the same woman who helped start Mountain Rose Herbs, so they are trying to support farmers who will grow the endangered plants so we can have a sustainable supply of them on the market while they are being responsibly propagated. Its pretty awesome

Organoleptic testing involves the use of the human senses— sight, smell, taste, and touch. To expert distillers, the senses are used as the first line of quality testing to provide immediate clues to the acceptability of a product. Oil that has an unusual smell, uneven consistency, or strange color instantly tells the distiller that something is wrong. Often times, this testing is used as a preliminary quality control step before any other tests are conducted.
This is non-sense. Essential Oils are regularly used in cuisine around the world, particularly Asia. There is an FDA approved list for GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) essential oils, provided that they are pure and without any carrier oil or impurities – and have been produced without solvents. You don’t need a trained health care practitioner to consult with – and “aromatherapist” hardly qualifies as a health care practitioner anyways. Please tell me what an aromatherapy course teaches regarding digestion and internal biology in relation to essential oils? Stop spreading fear about the use of essential oils for food and beverage preparation.
The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? Its important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by the company themselves and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgements about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
This is several months too late, but not even Young Living and doTerra eucalyptus are safe to ingest. I distribute doTerra and it is listed as NOT for internal use. When it is used as an ingredient for an internal blend or lozenges, the amount is incredibly small. It is safer to use eucalyptus as an inhalant or in a diffuser, or dilute in a chest rub.
Much of my frustration comes from mlm companies proclaiming that THEIR oils are the best and that therapeutic grade means everything. Because there are not alot of distilleries around the world, many of us are getting our oils from the exact same places. Yet MLM’s tend to jack their prices up to over double in some cases, and use their claims as being the best to fortify the price increase. I do feel for consumers though. It is hard to know who to trust. I know of quite a few wonderful companies out there, besides mine that have wonderful, well priced oils. Yes, as you said, you will also pay for quality, but you need to trust who that supplier is. MLM’s will always have higher prices because of their structure. While that bothers me, it is their exclusivity that bothers me more, especially when I know we are sourcing from the same places.
Hi Francis – Food grade oils are approved for use as food flavorings, though it’s a mistake to believe that they are therefore also approved as internal medicines. They are known by the designation FCC (Food Chemicals Codex). Pharmaceutical grade oils are usually known by the designation BP (British Pharmacopoeia) or USP (U.S Pharmacopeia). The two standards are the same. None of the grades particularly applies to the use of essential oils in aromatherapy, and many pharmaceutical grade oils are only approved as flavorings – to make a medicine taste better. Therapeutic grade is a great idea, it just doesn’t exist yet!
One example of oil that shows some evidence of effectiveness is tea tree oil, which may be an effective treatment for acne, according to the NIH. In one clinical trial, researchers compared gel containing tea tree oil to a benzoyl peroxide product, and found that the benzoyl peroxide worked slightly better but that the tea tree oil had fewer side effects, according to the NIH.
Although they may not be the perfect replacement for all synthetic pesticides, essential oils have prospects for crop or indoor plant protection, urban pest control,[31] and marketed insect repellants, such as bug spray. Certain essential oils have been shown in studies to be comparable, if not exceeding, in effectiveness to DEET, which is currently marketed as the most effective mosquito repellent. Although essential oils are effective as pesticides when first applied in uses such as mosquito repellent applied to the skin, it is only effective in the vapor stage. Since this stage is relatively short-lived, creams and polymer mixtures are used in order to elongate the vapor period of effective repellency.[27]
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