If you are using Firefox or Google Chrome as a browser there is an app/add-on called “adblocker plus”. Download and install it. When you see floating icons like that and they bother you, right-click over them and scroll down to “block element” or “use adblock” and click OK/Submit/Add. This will remove the floating script/image and allow for better viewing.
Peppermint supports healthy gut function and normal digestion, she says, and can be used topically to soothe sore muscles. "It's important to note that peppermint is a 'hot' oil, which means it needs to be diluted before applying to your skin," said Dunaway. "Before applying it topically, peppermint oil should be diluted with a carrier oil like coconut oil."
As we mentioned earlier, the FDA generally classifies essential oils as cosmetics, but they can also sometimes be considered drugs. In a quote direct from the US Food and Drug Administration website, “The law doesn’t require cosmetics to have FDA approval before they go on the market.” In addition, if a product claims to affect the health and function of the body, such as relieving anxiety, aiding digestion or calming sore muscles, the product must be approved by the FDA as a drug, which is a very long and costly process.
Bedwetting could be due to a number of reasons. However one, that is not commonly looked at is Breathing issues. my husband is an holistic dentist and part of treatment for early ortho is Breathing…If the child is a mouth breather often he will not be getting the right ratio of oxygen to carbon dioxide causing all sorts of developmental problems..Bedwetting is helped or completely eliminated when addressed as such…. A small piece of micropore tape over the mouth at nights works wonders. Also there are mouth guard type appliances which help (you can get these from some dentists. Hope this helps Judi
First and foremost, the grading systems companies use to grade their products are all relative because there is no regulation of the grades. So when it says "therapeutic grade", that just means it's that companies idea of therapeutic grade. That's not to say they are misrepresenting their products, but there will be variance between products because there is no standard, so finding a brand you trust is important.
The findings of the new study are consistent with earlier work. For example, a 2011 study of 131 herbal tea products found that 33 percent were contaminated. Still, the estimates from the new study should be interpreted with caution, and refined with further research, because the study tested products from just 12 out of the 1,000 companies that make herbal products.

I keep reading comments about not Ingesting EO. I’ve researched young living brand EO and they are injestable. They are a therapeutic hospital grade. And their founder Gary young Takes many eo in capsules daily. Not all brands are. So I would only trust this particular brand because I’ve done the research on it. I know people who add YL lemon or grapefruit daily to water a drop is fine you don’t want to do more than that it can cause cramping and pain these oils are highly Concentrated. Make sure you do your research, for it is the only way you will be safe using these oils they are very powerful and in the wrong hands of someone who is not educating themselves can be very harmful. I attribute my nieces grades in school going up due to eo. They have helped her focus and help her attention. My moods have changes as well as my daily stress, anxiety and nervousness. I love eo and all they have done for my family.
Different chemotypes / species / origins generally denote different effects. So if you want a calming action from lavender, you might choose one high in linalool, perhaps French or Ukranian, and if you want a lavender that’s good for insect bites or repelling fleas, you might choose one that’s also high in some of the minor constituents – probably Australian, Bulgarian, or a lavandin.
Hi, I was wondering if you have heard of White Lotus Aromatics? If so what are your thoughts on them? I’m somewhat new to the essential oil life, I just bought a couple of oils from Rocky Mountain Essential Oils, but I’m going further down the rabbit hole in my research for the best essential oils out there. I’ve been reading a lot on White Lotus, but will also be checking out Native Americans.
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Young children and the elderly may be more sensitive to essential oils. So you may need to dilute them more. And you should totally avoid some oils, like birch and wintergreen. In even small amounts, those may cause serious problems in kids 6 or younger because they contain a chemical called methyl salicylate. Don’t use essential oils on a baby unless your pediatrician says it’s OK.
Tisserand and Balacs further point out that “the only likely risk would be from prolonged exposure (perhaps 1 hour or more) to relatively high levels of essential oil vapor which could lead to headaches, vertigo, nausea and lethargy”. With regard to internal use, NAHA does not support the indiscriminate internal use of essential oils. Click here for more information.
100% Pure. Oils that say “pure” or “100% pure” are allowed to have as little as 51% essential oil by law! Isn’t that amazing? Therefore, “pure” on the label doesn’t really mean pure. And, even if an oil is “pure” in the sense of not being diluted, it may still be adulterated with synthetic chemicals, residual pesticides and with solvents, or it may be of mediocre medicinal quality.
Massage: Place several drops of your diluted oil mixture into your hand and rub them together. Then spread that oil onto your skin — or your partner’s skin — with long strokes. The warmth and friction of your hands will dispense the oil directly into the skin, muscles and bloodstream. Using the right essential oils can relax tension, relieve sore muscles and even improve your skin. Plus it just feels so darn good to get a massage.

Yes, essential oil adulteration exists, though this doesn’t always involve synthetic chemicals. One of the most common frauds is to add lavandin oil to lavender oil, though this is not difficult to detect with GC analysis. But, the idea that virtually all essential oils that are sold in health stores are, by definition, adulterated, is baseless. There is no evidence for it, and there never has been any.


This kind of statement has always left me scratching my head. Sometimes it is also stated as “….EOs are the most OXYGENATED substances on earth.” Whether its meant to be OXYGENATING or OXYGENATED the statement is just plain wrong. Yes essential oils contain oxygen but that doesn’t equate to be “oxygenating” or the “most oxygenated.” Those of you taking my Chemistry of Essential Oils course already know that, 99+% of the time, when we are talking about essential oil molecules, we are concerned only with 3 elements of the periodic table: Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen. The molecules in essential oils are mainly mono and sesquiterpenes and their oxygenated derivatives. Essential oils are volatile organic liquids. There are absolutely NO HORMONES (at least not human hormones) OR VITAMINS in essential oils. In addition, of these 3 most common EO elements, Oxygen is the LEAST frequently occurring. If you are just counting types of atoms in the essential oil molecules, Hydrogen is the most prevalent atom followed by Carbon, then Oxygen (again just counting numbers of atoms, not a weight comparison). A large percentage of all essential oil molecules are hydrocarbons (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and don’t even contain Oxygen at all. When the molecules do contain Oxygen, the ratio typically ranges from 1 or 2 atoms of Oxygen to say 10 to 17 atoms of Carbon and 18 to 26 atoms of Hydrogen (for the most common cases of oxygenated mono and sesquiterpenes). Furthermore, the Oxygen in essential oil molecules is BOUND OXYGEN not really available to be delivered in the form of free oxygen radical or oxygen molecules (of course there an infinitesimal amount of dissolved oxygen molecules in just about any liquid but this is insignificant) and thus not very “oxygenating.” It is still unclear to me what the basis for these claims concerning essential oils are coming from and would love to know the literature sources that the claimants are citing as their support. I could go on more about this topic but Robert Tisserand has already written an excellent response to the “Oxygenating” myth on his website, so rather than re-invent the wheel I will refer all of you to read his comments there.
As an aromatic food supplement, essential oils are a playground for the nose and probably safe in small quantities. They may be useful in modulating the mind-body connection, but as primary medical treatment for most disease conditions, there is no evidence to suggest they work. I’d recommend spending your hard-earned money on chemical compounds that do.
Hi i have just recently seen doTerra but have been using Amazing Scents for a while. I would like to know how they compare. They both claim they source their products from around the world where they are best produced. They say doTerra is safe to consume internally whereas Amazing Scents are only for external use. Can someone give me some insight about Amazing Scents and whether EO are safe to ingest.

Essential oils rich in aldehydes (e.g., citronellal, citral) and phenols (e.g., cinnamic aldehyde, eugenol) may cause skin reactions. Essential oils rich in these constituents should always be diluted prior to application to the skin. According to Schnaubelt, “diluting such oils so that the resulting solution becomes non-irritant, may require diluting them to concentrations much lower than in normal circumstances. Another option is to blend such irritant oils asymmetrically with other essential oils, which mitigate their irritant effects.”3
Yes you can mix Tea Tree and Rosemary EOS (essential oils). And while using less expensive brands for cleaning might make sense to some,they will not disinfectant the way pure oils will. I would only use a proven pure EO on my body internally and externally. Anything you put on your skin goes into your body in 26 seconds. Young Living owns their own farms, everything is beyond organic, they distill in their own distilleries which are open along with the farms world wide for any member to visit and learn from. The oils are 3rd party tested. By law an EO manufacturer can put 100% pure on their bottles and only have 5% pure EO, they don’t have to say what the other 95% is. My recommendation… Do your homework!
No point on your feet, sweat glands on your feet, nothing that would actually absorb, only thing you are doing by putting it on your feet is inhaling it as you put it on your feet, but you are already doing that putting it on your chest, why waste it. Just google are there pores on your feet–dermatologist articles all over saying bottom line just what I said.
A frequency is simply a cycle per second. From quantum mechanics we know that electromagnetic energy is typically measured by looking at the wavelengths of electromagnetic waves used to cause various energy transitions between quantum states. These wavelengths can be translated to frequencies through a simple equation (frequency of the electromagnetic energy is the speed of light divided by the measured wavelength). Molecules emit and absorb energy in various forms resulting from electronic, vibrational and rotational energy level transitions. If your going to talk about vibrational frequencies then its necessary to understand some basic chemistry and quantum mechanics which I will attempt to explain below without getting too technical.

The global essential oil market is expected to reach 11.7 billion by 2022. There is a danger in the mass popularity of essential oils and not just because of the way in which they are being used (or in many cases, overused), or that they are being sold widely by people whose only training is from  the companies that stand to profit directly off mass consumption of these oils.  There is also the impact this production is having on the environment.


I looked into the proprietary claim a little further and there really isn't much to it. Pure oil is pure oil. You would see the compounds of plant matter and maybe the location of origin. That's pretty much it. The best oils on the planet, each specific one, typically comes from only a few locations, with each region having distillers that work with a specific plant. I sent the following email last year in response to their request for the non-disclosure in exchange for lab results, and their request to know how they were going to be used.
So, as you can see, it would be impossible to characterize an essential oil or even a single essential oil molecule as having a single vibrational energy frequency. Furthermore, the energy of vibration in molecules is way higher than the 52 Mhz – 320 MHz (52,000,000 – 320,000,000 Hertz) range claimed by the people selling the eo frequency measuring devices. In fact, that low energy range would be in the radio waves region and below.
Mountain Rose Herbs also holds quite a few certifications and awards pertaining to their product sourcing, including non-GMO project certification, and the 2013 Best Green Business’s To Work For In Oregon. Overall, this company is making quite a few awesome commitments to better, green business practices and if you like this ideology, this is your company to support.
In Dawn-Mari’s pitch (she’s basically selling her classes and her essential oils) she makes the following comment: Only therapeutic grade essential oils should be used to ensure safety and that there are no synthetic or toxic chemicals being introduced to the body. Unfortunately, less than 2 percent of the essential oil found in health-food stores and the like are actually therapeutic grade, even though the label might say something like “100-percent pure”.
Thank you for all you are doing to educate all of us about essential oils. My question is this: I noticed earlier in this thread that one of your recommended sources of essential oils was a company called Appalachian Valley in Maryland. But I noticed later on that when you listed your recommended suppliers, Appalachian Valley is not on the list. Did you leave them off of your newer list for any particular reason? I would like to get some oils from them, but when I saw that your new list didn’t include them, I wondered whether I should rethink my potential purchase. So, does Appalachan Valley still pass muster, or no?
Another ridiculous claim by people who understand basically nothing about chemistry. I am not sure I know of anything that will last even as long as the earth remains, with perhaps the exceptions of diamonds and human ignorance LOL. The truth is that while the oil may last in the sense that it “exists” for a long time, there is no question that most oils, pure or otherwise, will eventually go bad due to oxidation reactions that are unavoidable unless you could somehow store them in an oxygen free atmosphere (basically impossible for most people). Even if stored in an inert atmosphere there is still the possibility of some EO molecules reacting with themselves over long periods, changing the oil, many times for the worse.

The last century has seen a tremendous amount of change in the field of aromatherapy and essential oil use. A general trend to move away from synthetic chemicals back to more natural cleaning and health products have brought essential oils to the forefront and made them more readily available. With the many different essential oils to choose from, and the many brands, both in our stores and over the Internet, choosing a high quality essential oil can seem a daunting task. As a consumer, what should you look for to help guide your choice?
If a bottle states not for ingestion or internal use, you should put the bottle down and walk away because there are toxic chemicals in it. You CAN and SHOULD be able to ingest your oils and is exactly why you should ONLY use therapeutic grade E.O’s. Things that go on your skin become absorbed into your bloodstream just the same as if you take it internally but it by passes the digestion process which means its even more important to make sure whatever you put on your skin is pesticide free, chemical free and natural.

Hi Julie, it is entirely possible that you have had an allergic reaction to one of the essential oils you ingested. It is possible that that the lemon oil might have oxidized in the bottle in the store, and this increases the risk of allergy. It’s also possible that you are simply allergic to one of those oils. It has nothing to do with detoxing – that’s a total myth.

Amanda, I don’t know what your qualification is to make such a bold statement. MANY, MANY, MANY, MANY people use Young Living oils internally WITHOUT adverse side effects and WITHOUT burning their esophagus or hurting their gut flora, in fact it improves gut flora if you know what oils to use. Oils ingested are usually done so via a veggie capsule or can be mixed with water or Young Living’s NingXia Red. I myself ingest YLEOs on a daily basis and have been able to get off my proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) medication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which was causing the nice side effect of osteopenia (pre osteoporosis). If you know what you’re doing and do the research, oils are extremely beneficial without nasty side effects. Yes, I am a YL distributor, but I became one after using the oils for a while myself and on my pets and seeing great improvement in our situation. Hope that clears up the ingestion issue for you.

This is my question too, as I recently met someone trying to sell me each of those brands. Currently I’m researching the doTerra brand, and find it strange that they’re not labeled organic, so I wondered if that’s important (is it just due to the difficulty/cost of getting the actual certification but they’re naturally grown, or are these just probably a mixture of plants grown under likely conventional methods?) or why companies who sell essential oils wouldn’t sell organics. Seems strange to me…


There is also an argument from YL distributors that their oils come from the best crops in the world. As they grow their own crops and only use their own, not sure how they can claim it’s unarguably the best in the world. Every crop is different. Only sampling every crop, every batch would support that claim. Anyway, I am not a qualified aromatherapist either but my research suggests that YL oils and their advice might be best to avoid.
"Synthetic essential oils may seem like a bargain," says Rupinder Mangat, CEO of Mevei. "It can be difficult to tell the difference between a synthetic oil or a real one. But be careful—chemically reconstructed oils seldom include all the trace chemicals that are found in the real plant. Price can be an indication that an oil is synthetically reproduced or extended."

A genuine therapeutic grade standard for essential oils is a great idea, it just doesn’t exist at this point in time. What does exist is the ISO standard, for many essential oils – http://www.iso.org/iso/home.html – and for organic certification, an organization called IFOAM – http://www.ifoam.org – the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements, which was formed in 1972. Certified organic essential oils have been available since the 1980s. Maybe not in your local health store, but they were being produced.

I'm updating this post years later to add important information. I do not have all of the information in this series on why I didn't choose certain companies so I would appreciate you not accusing me of coming to silly conclusions. I have gotten threatening emails (some of they cryptic threats), and have been warned about being sued if I published certain things.


I’ve also been plagued with terrible leg cramps for about 3 years now. So bad at times i couldn’t go up or down steps without cramping. They started like yours at night while I was trying to sleep. They would wake me from a sound sleep with excruciating pain and I couldn’t even move to get out of bed to try to relieve them. Drs could not give me any help they only prescribed muscle relaxers which I didn’t take.
Vibrational energy in molecules refers to the the vibration of bound atoms within a particular molecule. For example, if we look at a very simple molecule like carbon dioxide, we can measure the vibration or frequency of what is referred to the carbonyl stretch (the stretching motion of the double bond between the carbon and the oxygen atoms). The larger the molecule is the more vibrational motions it will have. Molecules in essential oils would have many different bond vibrations going on because even the smaller molecules (monoterpenes) consist of 10 carbon atoms and 16 hydrogen atoms. Thus all essential oil molecules would have many different vibrations going on simultaneously and each different type of vibrational motion in each different bond would have its own characteristic frequency. These vibrational frequencies in molecules are measured using infrared (IR) spectroscopy because energy in the IR range of the electromagnetic spectrum is what is required to cause these vibrations. The magnitude of Infrared radiation is in the 10,000,000,000,000 to 400,000,000,000,000 Hertz range!
IF Your Bottle Of EO Says 100% Pure But Not For Internal Use It Isn’t Pure. If It Says Ok For InterNal Use It Is Pure. Young Living Did Some Testing On Another Lavender EO froM Another Company And It Tested That It hAd Vanilla In It. The Product Did Say 100% Pure On It. Well If It Was 100% Pure It Wouldnt Have Had Vanilla In It. I Use Yl Eo & I Love Them. I Take Them InternallY.Yes Their Expensive But Im A True BelieveR You Get WhAt You Pay For!
Wondering how those great smelling essential oils are made? Turns out, essential oils aren’t “made” at all. They ARE “extracted” from plants, herbs and spices. But just because they are extracted from plants doesn’t mean the way they’re sourced is all the same. In fact, the way they’re extracted from the plant or herb can have a big impact on the quality. Here’s a quick rundown of the two primary ways essential oils are extracted from the plants.
I looked into the proprietary claim a little further and there really isn't much to it. Pure oil is pure oil. You would see the compounds of plant matter and maybe the location of origin. That's pretty much it. The best oils on the planet, each specific one, typically comes from only a few locations, with each region having distillers that work with a specific plant. I sent the following email last year in response to their request for the non-disclosure in exchange for lab results, and their request to know how they were going to be used.
I just started using EO’s, several of my friends sell YL EO’s and that is all they recommend, however, doing my own research I’ve settled on Mountain Rose Herb. The EO’s are great quality and are resonable. I’ve bought twice as much for half the price. I like MRH because it is organic, sustainable and fair trade. Use your own judgement and choose what you think is best. I will say this, everytime I’m on facebook and some one asks about EO’s I do recommend MRH with no sales pitch, just “try MRH” and almost the next post is a marketing speech telling the same person about YL and why they are the only ones to go with. So like I said, do your research and I’d say “try MRH”
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies essential oils as food supplements, not drugs. This means producers of essential oils are not allowed to market the compounds as medicine. In fact, they must clearly state the product is “not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.” According to the Dietary Supplemental Health and Education Act of 1994, this classification also means the FDA is not allowed to regulate the sale or use of essential oils unless they can prove a particular product poses a serious threat.
This is a good starter kit, especially if you don't want to spend a fortune on something that may not be your thing. We don't use all 6 of these, so I'm glad I didn't get suckered into buying a more pricey brand. I've purchased expensive essential oils and less expensive ones like these, and these are a good value. Don't get caught up buying multi-level marketing brands like **terra, just buy what works for you and your budget and enjoy!

Many essential oils companies sell their EOs undiluted, so you’ll have to dilute them yourself (NAHA provides some guidelines on safe dilution). Adults should dilute an essential oil anywhere from 2.5 to 10 percent; for a 10 percent dilution, for example, you'd use 60 drops of essential oil per ounce of carrier. Some of the most common carrier oils are jojoba, coconut, and sesame oil.
As far back as A.D. 1000, healers used mechanical presses or steam to extract essential oils from fragrant plants. Today, practitioners can rub oil-infused lotions on the skin, where the compounds are absorbed into the bloodstream. Or they can diffuse them into the air where, once inhaled, they bind to smell receptors and stimulate the central nervous system, says Joie Power, PhD, a neuropsychologist and aromatherapist who has taught nurses how to use the oils for decades.
I went to an Essential oils party last week (YL). They had everyone put a little bit of water in a glass, then a drop of oil (I used grapefruit) and then fill the rest with water and drink. I wondered if it was safe since I’m 27 weeks pregnant, but since the leader made no mention of caution (and one of them was also pregnant) I assumed it was ok. Now after doing research, I’m horrified and so worried I have harmed my baby! What are your thoughts? Since grapefruit is on the “safe” list and I only used one drop (and don’t plan to ever again!) do you think it’s ok? I’m completely panicking and so mad at myself for making an assumption.

The aroma of an essential oil can be a good indication of its purity and quality. The more pure an essential oil, the more powerful the aroma will be, and the more it will be able to elicit the response that you desire without being overwhelming to the senses. The plants we use to extract our essential oils are grown in nutrient-rich soil with ideal conditions such as air quality and precipitation. They are also harvested at the peak of their quality to ensure a rich, aromatic essential oil. These methods guarantee that the fragrance and quality of our oils will exceed that of synthetic or diluted oils, even those that claim to be “natural” or “pure.” In addition, each oil used by ZEVA is tested using gas chromatography to insure it contains the active phytochemicals and to insure maximum potency.
Thank you so much for all of your information that you share. It seems like when I google something about essential oils, I frequently end up on your site. I am new to essential oils and not sure what to expect. It seems like when I use them in lotion, roll-on, or even a eucalyptus steam the scent dissipates relatively quickly. I am not sure if I am not adding enough essential oils, if I am buying lower quality essential oils, or if I am expecting too much. For instance, a 8 oz batch of lotion (I used 30 drops total of essential oil)that I made last week no longer has a scent to it (at least to me). Any insight on this?
We offer a wide range of USDA Organic Certified and Conventional Essential Oils to many of the flavor, fragrance, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries worldwide. Our Company works with farming partners that have been in business for over 30 years, harvesting the finest, most naturally grown seasonal crops, and in turn producing the purest 100% natural essential oils through steam distillation and cold pressed extraction. In addition to being ISO 9001:2008 & WHO GMP Certified, our farming partners are Kosher and Halal Certified.
So, what’s your take on companies like Young Living Oil, which basically give me the vibe of “our oil is the only true and pure one out there”. I’m not sold on the idea, and don’t know that I’ll be purchasing anything other than their Thieves blend, when it comes to EOs for my soaps, lotions, and salves. I know you’re mainly addressing aromatherapy and massage here, but would the same principles apply to homemade healthcare products, as well?
NOW Foods runs an in-house full facility laboratory and utilizes third party testing only when necessary. They do put their oils through Gas Chromatography (GC) testing and Infrared Spectometry. A selection of their assortment are USDA certified organic essential oils, and their oils are natural and 100% pure. One jasmine blend is clearly labeled as synthetic, but it is the only one in their assortment and the reason is explained on NOW’s essential oils FAQ page here, basically justifying the synthetic scent due to the very high price of pure jasmine oil.
I’ve read the other blog about homemade deodorant and im looking to give it a shot. recently ive had painful reactions to deodorant and antiperspirant (all types and brands, even natural or organic like toms and green beaver) so im trying to get down to fewer and fewer ingredients. i have some essential tea tree oil and mixed it with some coconut oil but i still stink 🙁 . Im looking for an oil that i can use that will be strong but relatively “neutral” in smell ( im a guy so im not too interested in smelling like lavender), but it has to be able to be put on my skin without any reactions. Anyone have any suggestions?

There are so many other factors, OMG: a vast change of life and responsibility, the huge challenges of parenthood, the (low) value our society gives parents and mothers, sexism, etc etc. I found it important to explore and heal these things are they came up when I was a young mother, but boy, there was something off chemically for me that no amount of healing addressed.
Hello Ellen,I just started using YL and I started puttimg straight frankencense on a skin cancer that was needing cut out.Ive allready had one taken out the size of my thumbnail.The new spot is now gone but im still putting oil on til i feels safe.My freinds totally acned out face is now totally clear.Yes its costly,but you have the alternative to be a salesman(like marykay etc).+ work from home.As far as their license?have no clue though I dont see how a 9 country operation could be so careless .I love love their products,but i still find great natural products at cheaper cost.All i know is I found something that really works and still cheaper than a doctor for now.
I am not pregnant, but potentially could be within the next year or so. If it is not advised to use essential oils during pregnancy, what would be a good replacement in lieu of using your cleansing oils and moisturizer since both contain essential oils? I currently OCM using your oils and I don’t think my skin would be very happy with me if I didn’t wash my face for 9+ months. 😉 Nevermind the fact that I’ve had troubled skin throughout my life so the thought of pregnancy acne terrifies me.

Frankincense can be used for depression, inflammation, immunity, and to increase spiritual awareness.Today, scientists, physicians and researchers are beginning to return to the use of essential oils as a way to naturally and holistically heal our bodies. Frankincense actually has a history of medicinal use and could be quite helpful in your medicine cabinet.
If you are seriously interested in diving into the world of essential oils, get trained. Start with a workshop in your local area taught by a trained aromatherapist. Whether you are using the oils purely for personal use or really want to get into the business of selling oils and sharing your knowledge, unbiased aromatherapy training from a certified aromatherapist and/or herbalist is invaluable.
There has never been a documented instance of an anti-body response (i.e. sensitization) to an essential oil. Essential oil antibodies have never been found or detected in anyone. Unless sensitization occurs and antibodies are produced and stored in the body, there can be no allergic reaction. Therefore, we can state unequivocally that essential oils are not and cannot be allergens. Sometimes people do have allergy-like reactions but these are no allergenic in nature. They are detox reactions.
Hi. I have a question. I have always read that in order to make essential oil you need tons of a plant to get a little bit of the the oil itself, like you mentioned in the article. So it seems like something that can only be made industrially. But I also see recipes for homemade essential oils. So, my question is: Are these homemade oils real essential oils? Or is there another name for those ones? Are they as good in terms of benefits for the skin and its scents properties?
In short: DO NOT TAKE ESSENTIAL OILS INTERNALLY unless they have been prescribed to you individually by a qualified and clinically-trained medical professional or Clinical Registered Aromatherapist. When working with essential oils you are ultimately playing with chemistry; if you do not know the specific chemistry of the specific oils, and what that specific collection of chemical constituents in that oil can do to your body, then avoid internal administration and stick with the aromatic processes.
"Oral ingestion results in ten times the amount of absorption into the bloodstream of an essential oil compared to topical application," Ferrari says. "This type of application is usually used for short-term treatment of more serious ailments, like bacterial infections (some essential oils are effective against the MRSA bacteria, for example), viral infections, and even cancer."
Nicole – this has been a controversial issue for most of my lifetime, and still is – so there’s no simple answer. Let me put it this way – I know someone who died needlessly because she thought she could treat herself with essential oils. But generally, I don’t have a problem with people self-treating. What I do have a problem with is people treating others medicinally when they don’t understand the pharmacology and toxicology of essential oils, or the pathology of disease. Some of the risks include mucous membrane irritation, fetal damage in pregnancy, drug interactions, and seizures. When oils are taken orally, or otherwise used intensively, these risks all increase.
The Young Living Speech you give is completely inaccurate and part of the genius marketing used by YL. Oils that have “do not consume” are protecting themselves from lawsuits, it’s a reasonable label statement. I am an educator at a major US University teaching essential oil studies. I have worked in production and quality control of essential oils.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
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