Our in-house laboratory is staffed by highly qualified chemists and technicians. It employs state-of-the-art analytical equipment that allows us to perform highly specialized analyses, such as Gas Chromatography and Infrared Spectrometry. We use our own analysis results to confirm specification sheet reports and certificates of analyses received from 3rd party outside laboratories and vendors. As always, when it comes to Essential Oils, individual practitioners and consumers will decide for themselves which variety of a flower or leaf produces the essential oil that best suits their particular need. With NOW pure essential oils, you can be assured that you have the real thing.
Getting in touch with customer service at NOW Health Group is a little bit less straight-forward. Their website lists all of their corporate offices (with phone numbers), but there is no one toll-free line mentioned for customer service or order inquiries. You can check online FAQ’s, fill out a product feedback form, or fill in an email inquiry form. For those of us who don’t like to deal via email, this could be the deciding factor between choosing NOW or another reputable brand that possibly offers easier access to talking to a real person. That said, NOW is definitely one of the bigger companies overall, and possibly they’d have huge call volumes if they opened their doors with a toll free line.
Essential oils are also known as volatile oils because they evaporate quickly after coming in contact with oxygen. An essential oil is, simply put, the "essence" of a plant, obtained by water or steam distillation, or by cold pressing (for citrus peel oils). Through this process, the oils inside a plant can be extracted into a highly concentrated form.
Low Price. When it comes to essential oils, you get what you pay for. Growing, harvesting and distilling essential oils of the highest medicinal quality requires extra time and labor, requiring methods that are frankly slower and “less efficient” than modern large commercial producers. It’s the basic law of supply and demand: a small supply of a higher quality product will always cost more than a large supply of a lower quality product.

This is the first time that I purchase Frankincense and I am glad I did. I want you to know that my knowledge about essential oils is very minimal so I am only writing this review based on my humble experience with it. I use the oil mainly for meditation (grounding and purpose), which I practice twice a day for 30 minutes. Before I set my practice, I take the little bottle and I bring it right to my nostrils. Then, I deeply inhale the aroma and I exhale through my mouth (I repeat this 3 times). If I need to interpret the aroma, I will say that it has a sweet and woodsy feeling to it. It almost reminds me of the smell of pines in a warm summer night...but not quite. I truly enjoy my experience of the Frankincense oil during meditation. Now that I have fallen in love with its charming and mysterious scent, I know I will buy more. By the way, I have to say that the seller's customer care was stellar from the very beginning.


Hi there! I know in your list of 21 facts you said these oils should not be ingested…I have heard otherwise about a few specific brands. What were your true thoughts on this? Do you or have you used any oils internally? Or anyoneelse on here maybe? Really wanting to heal from the inside as well as using these topically. Thanks in advance! I’m still pretty new at this so any input or advice would be great!
DaNelle started to take an interest in a healthier lifestyle after suffering from two debilitating chronic diseases. On a mission to create a farm of her own, DaNelle forced, or rather 'lovingly persuaded' her husband to purchase a ranch home on an acre of land and transform it into their very own urban farm. DaNelle blogs at Weed 'em & Reap where she writes about the sustainable backyard farming, traditional food, & natural remedies.

Essential oils are usually lipophilic (literally: "oil-loving") compounds that usually are not miscible with water. They can be diluted in solvents like pure ethanol and polyethylene glycol. The most common way to safely dilute essential oils for topical use is in a carrier oil. This can be any vegetable oil readily available, the most popular for skin care being jojoba, coconut, wheat germ, olive and avocado.[32]

Lavender oil is claimed to have a slew of a health benefits, with aromatherapy practitioners using it for anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, depression, headache, upset stomach and hair loss. Some small studies on using lavender for anxiety have yielded mixed results, and some studies suggest the oil may work in combination with other oils to fight a hair-loss condition called alopecia areata, according to the NIH. However, "there is little scientific evidence of lavender's effectiveness for most health uses," the NIH says.


Essential oils are not really oils. They do not contain the fatty acids that constitute what we would consider an actual oil. Valerie Gennari Cooksley, author of Aromatherapy: Soothing Remedies to Restore, Rejuvenate and Heal defines essential oils as “highly concentrated plant constituents possessing potent medicinal and cosmetic qualities.” However, I think Stephanie Tourles nailed it in Organic Body Care recipes when she said, “I consider essential oils the life force or the soul of the plant.”
This is a general summary for people who are using essential oils on a casual basis. 🙂 I didn’t want to muddy the waters here. However, I would gladly revise my statement if the oils were taken internally under the care of a naturopath or other professional. I just don’t think people should, willy nilly, run around taking them internally, due to their potency.
When washing clothes I use regular soap (haven’t looked into home made yet), and then put about 2 tablespoons of Epsom salt scented with a few drops of essential oils into the bottom of the washer before adding clothes. Then instead of using fabric softner I fill the dispenser with regular white vinegar. It keeps the washer from getting that funky smell and my clothes come out way softer. At first I was worried you would be able to smell the vinegar, but I have been doing this for 6 months now and you really can’t smell it! The Epsom salt doesn’t really have to have essential oil in it, the scent seems to rinse out in the wash but I like the little burst of scent you get when you dump it in, and use fairly cheap oils like citrus for it. If you want your clothes to actually smell of the oils you can get some wool dryer balls and add an oil of your choice before drying.
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Simple smells such as lavender, chamomile, and rosewater may help keep you calm. You can breathe in or rub diluted versions of these oils on your skin. Scientists think they work by sending chemical messages to parts of the brain that affect mood and emotion. Although these scents alone won’t take all your stress away, the aroma may help you relax.

Anyway, on to my question…I am basically interested in the most basic of oils. Peppermint, lavender, lemon or orange and possibly tea tree as my daughter has severe scalp (dandruff ?) issues. I also have recently started to make soap and am looking dor something natural yet affordable to scent them with. Where would u recommend I get these oils for this use?


Some essential oils qualify as GRAS flavoring agents for use in foods, beverages, and confectioneries according to strict Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and flavorist standards.[48] Pharmacopoeia standards for medicinal oils should be heeded. Some oils can be toxic to some domestic animals, cats in particular.[49] The internal use of essential oils can pose hazards to pregnant women, as some can be abortifacients in dose 0.5–10 mL, and thus should not be used during pregnancy.[citation needed]
The Aromatherapist generally desires to use the whole, naturally balanced, pure, natural oil. Pure essential oils may contain trace constituents, which may not as yet have been detected or identified which make up the totality of the oil. These would not be present in a reconstructed or synthetically produced oil. It is perhaps best to trust that nature will provide the correct balance. We are, after all, dealing with the soul of the plant, and who among us can reconstruct such a thing?
I’ve enjoyed reading this site. There is a lot of good information and banter (though some isn’t so friendly, chill guys). I myself have only been using EO’s for a little under two years. Yes, they have changed my life and for the first time I feel empowered and able to be in charge of my own health care. I am healthier now than I’ve been in a very long time. I’m one of those persons who will take the time to check things out. My daughter told me about EO’s and a fairly new company, doTERRA. I wanted to believe all the wonderful things she was telling me, but not without checking out the company and putting the products to the test. At a lot of expense for me I did some investigating. So far I’ve found the company to be sound and based on ethical principles. I checked into the CTPG cirtification and found it to be sound also. Though the company pays for these extensive tests, they themselves do not perform them. It is third party and I believe available for other companies. With how extensive these tests are it may not be cost prohibative for many companies, however. I hope that others will follow suit eventually cause I know there are many very good EO companines out there. I do believe in EO’s now as I’ve had remarkable results for many health concerns and haven’t had to go to the doctor since I’ve been using them. I’m glad there is a standard finally set up (you guys should check out testing, it’s remarkable)that insures complete purity so that I may feel safe using these oils in a variety of ways, including internally. And yes, they are safe in their PUREST form for internal use. Other companies that follow suit will just give me more choices and give doTERRA healthy competition. HEALTHY competition is a good thing in my book. These oils are starting to ease their way into western medicine. The coming together of a variety of health care choices is what’s needed in this country, and it’s about time. Keep up the good work everyone in taking charge of your own health and the health of your families. Let’s hear it for the family!!!!

All information on The Hippy Homemaker is meant for educational and informational purposes only. The statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Products and/or information are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease. Readers are advised to do their own research and make decisions in partnership with their health care provider. If you are pregnant, nursing, have a medical condition or are taking any medication, please consult your physician.

I have been bothered by yeast infections in past yrs(vaginal) knowing that most essential oils have antibacterial properties I did the following; In 1 cup bottled water I put 8 to 10 drops Rosemary essential oil, stirred it up, wet a washcloth with it and bathed the area. I had immeadiate relief from the horrible itching. If it came back do it again..It only took 2 treatments for me. that was a Godsend to me.


An essential oil is a concentrated hydrophobic liquid containing volatile (defined as "the tendency of a substance to vaporize") aroma compounds from plants. Essential oils are also known as volatile oils, ethereal oils, aetherolea, or simply as the oil of the plant from which they were extracted, such as oil of clove. An essential oil is "essential" in the sense that it contains the "essence of" the plant's fragrance—the characteristic fragrance of the plant from which it is derived.[1] The term essential used here does not mean indispensable as with the terms essential amino acid or essential fatty acid which are so called since they are nutritionally required by a given living organism.[2] In contrast to fatty oils, essential oils typically evaporate completely without leaving a stain or residue.
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