I am a total newby at all things crunchy, so bear with what may seem to be silly questions. I am pregnant, second trimester, and I see in the explanation above that you recommend avoiding EO’sduring pregnancy. I am interested in them for cleaning purposes, both home and body. Are you saying I shouldn’t use them in home made lotions and soaps, or just for direct massage? More explaination please.


No, don’t use it on your skin without diluting it. You can mix a drop or two into your moisturizer or into an oil like olive or coconut. Also, for acne and blackheads you also need to look at toxins in the other products you are using and make sure you are exfoliating several times a week. A green clay mask will also help pull toxins out of the skin. Just using rosemary oil without looking at the root causes of acne and blackheads will only go so far.

There are some essential oils that can be ingested in very small amounts. For example peppermint oil capsules, which help IBS symptoms. I have used Young Living essential oils and they are of very high quality. Whatever people decide to do it is important to remember that essential oils do not disperse into water and therefore even the ones that are safe to ingest need to be taken with a dispersant drink, like milk or within special capsule. It is advisable to consult a professional in any case. All the best.
Lavender has been used for over 2,500 years. First by the Egyptians as a perfume, it was later discovered to have many other benefits. It was first commercialized to the United States and Canada when it was sold by the English Quakers. Today there are countless countries around the world that participate in the production and almost every nation in the world has their own uses for Lavender Oil.
Dr. Robert Pappas says, “There are a lot of companies out there selling essential oils and most of them have no ability (or in many cases no desire) to do the necessary quality control to verify what they are getting from their supplier before they pass it on to their customers.” The GC/MS test determines quality and can show evidence of adulteration, although it is not perfect. Good companies will employ other tests as well like, Organoleptic (sensory tests), or FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy).

The brain plays an important role in the modulation of many symptoms and side effects, such as nausea, pain and stress. Aromatherapy can help patients cope with these problems. In fact, the Massage Therapy Team at Nationwide Children’s Hospital uses several essential oils, including lavender, sweet orange, peppermint and lemon/lime to support the well-being of patients. I’m taking advantage of the mind-body connection right now, diffusing a mixture of spearmint and a proprietary blend called “Breathe” as I write this post. I’m not sure it’s really keeping me on task, but I sure do enjoy the smell.

Hi Crunchy Betty, I love your blog and recently bought a whole bunch of carrier oils along with Lavender 40/42 essential oil . I didn’t realise this wasn’t the same as Lavender essential oil and used it (diluted with jojoba oil) on my face – the next morning I had tiny bumps all over my face which were red and very itchy, with slight swelling! Do you know what the difference between these two different oils are, and if the 40/42 is more dangerous to use than the other?  
Love this article and your references!! Much appreciated from someone who is new to the aromatherapy world and wanting more information. I hope to understand how to use EO for my family. I signed up with DoTERRA to get training and so far a month in haven’t received much training. So now I look for articles like this…wish I had a friend who was certified in aromatherapy so I can help my whole family understand what to use and how to use it with different problems. Reading articles helps but I definitely get overwhelmed with all the information…anyways love this article! Thanks!!
One of the keys to producing the highest quality essential oils is to have the highest quality growing conditions for the plants prior to extraction. For that reason, ZEVA focuses on sourcing our plants from indigenous regions where the growing conditions are ideal for the plants, rather than trying to force them to grow in a non-native, less hospitable environment. Our team works with suppliers from around the world to find the highest quality ingredients to go into every essential oil we produce.
Know how the plant was distilled and what part of the plant is being used. Ideally you're working with a trusted and trained aromatherapist so they can do this digging for you. How an oil is distilled is important to the quality. As well, some distillers may use more abundant/cheaper parts of a plant, but you're getting subpar product. For example you always want cinnamon bark, not cinnamon leaf. Another example is German Chamomile (Matricara chamomila). It is often adulterated with Blue Tansy (Tancetum annum), which is a lovely oil but it's not German Chamomile. 
Nicole – this has been a controversial issue for most of my lifetime, and still is – so there’s no simple answer. Let me put it this way – I know someone who died needlessly because she thought she could treat herself with essential oils. But generally, I don’t have a problem with people self-treating. What I do have a problem with is people treating others medicinally when they don’t understand the pharmacology and toxicology of essential oils, or the pathology of disease. Some of the risks include mucous membrane irritation, fetal damage in pregnancy, drug interactions, and seizures. When oils are taken orally, or otherwise used intensively, these risks all increase.
The essential oils industry is not regulated by the FDA, making comparison shopping quite difficult. Some essential oil brands use certain terminologies, others use different names for the same thing. A huge question lately is whether or not you can safely ingest essential oils. Some brands advertise internal use of essential oils, and others advise against it. I recommend to spend some time and get to know an essential oils brand first before you get their products through your door and trust them with the well-being of yourself and your family.
Think about this for a moment – the aromatherapy industry is not the only user of essential oils. In fact, aromatherapy accounts for a very small percentage. The majority of essential oils produced end up in food flavouring, pharmaceutical, perfumery and personal care and these essential oils are usually modified to meet the standards required for each of these industries.
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Horrible burn from acupuncture and essential oils followed by tanning. No one told me essential oils can be photo activated up have a horrible disfiguring burn on the backs of my knees my feet and my chest where I had acupuncture and essential oils DO NOT TAN AFTER ESSENTIAL OIL USE! If I could upload photos I would it’s horrible I have a huge blister on my foot
They are actually a very dark shade of violet. We are proud to use patented premium violet glass bottles that offer the greatest degree of protection from the damaging UV rays. Timeless and protective qualities of violet glass are traceable back to the ancient Egyptian civilization, when valuable essences and healing elixirs were kept in gold and violet glass containers. The unparalleled quality of our bottles ensures freshness and gives our oil an extended lifespan. Like a fine wine, some oils age gracefully when encased in violet glass walls.
The findings of the new study are consistent with earlier work. For example, a 2011 study of 131 herbal tea products found that 33 percent were contaminated. Still, the estimates from the new study should be interpreted with caution, and refined with further research, because the study tested products from just 12 out of the 1,000 companies that make herbal products.
Inside the living plant, essential oils serve several purposes, one of which is defense. Acting like the plant’s immune system, the oils help it fight off fungus or bacterial infection, and protect it from insects and animals. Another purpose is reproduction; the pleasing aromas attract pollinating insects like bees and butterflies. We’re not the only animals who like the smell of flowers.
“Here is a truly natural solution, which has been shown to benefit your eye health and the only one I will use. Gary Young has used this recipe for his patients at the Ecuador Clinic for macular degeneration, health issues, cataracts, and improving sight. I’ve been using it for a couple of years and love it! I started using this recipe before I had to have a vision exam in order to purchase new contacts. And I knew my vision had deteriorated from my last exam. So I put the drops in my eyes every night for about 6 months prior to the exam and my prescription had not changed according to their records, but I know what I was not seeing and I know what I was seeing as a result of using these drops – clearly my vision had improved! The recipe is as follows:
Knowing which of the many different species of a given plant will provide the most profound therapeutic health benefits is the first step in producing the highest quality essential oil. Relying on the expertise of botanists, chemists and wellness practitioners, botanical materials are carefully selected for their natural concentrations of active aromatic compounds.
The essential oils industry is not regulated by the FDA, making comparison shopping quite difficult. Some essential oil brands use certain terminologies, others use different names for the same thing. A huge question lately is whether or not you can safely ingest essential oils. Some brands advertise internal use of essential oils, and others advise against it. I recommend to spend some time and get to know an essential oils brand first before you get their products through your door and trust them with the well-being of yourself and your family.
I’m new to the world of EO’s. A doTerra-using friend made a “concoction” help my sinuses drain during an infection. EO’s involved are: eucalyptus, rosemary, melaleuca, doTerra’s Breathe blend, lime, and lavender in a coconut oil base. I slathered the oil mixture on my facial sinus areas, using the oils about 7 or 8 times in a 12 hour period. When I got up the next morning and washed my face, my face felt like I’d gotten a mild sunburn. Is this normal? Or an indication of anything? Too much EO to the face? Wrong choice of EO’s used for facial use? Thanks for any input!

Delivering the freshest product with the highest level of quality control is our top priority, and as a result we only have a small portion of finished product on-hand at any given time. Additionally, growers who produce plants that are both Certified Organic and up to our personal standards are exceedingly rare, and the few growers we’re lucky enough to work with can only produce so much raw material at a time.
Yes, essential oil adulteration exists, though this doesn’t always involve synthetic chemicals. One of the most common frauds is to add lavandin oil to lavender oil, though this is not difficult to detect with GC analysis. But, the idea that virtually all essential oils that are sold in health stores are, by definition, adulterated, is baseless. There is no evidence for it, and there never has been any.

What would be more accurate is that the more “pure” the oil is the more caution you should use in internal dose (“consumption”) – which is one of the least effective ways to use essential oils because they are broken down by the liver before absorption into the blood stream. If an oil is closer to a synthetic flavoring, like that used in chewing gum, then it would be deemed safer for consumption. I assume what YL sells as pure for use in consumption is similar to pure synthetic flavoring.


To date, there has been no company or organization that certifies essential oils. The MOA was established to fill this need. Companies who wish to have an independent organization test the quality of their oils for ISO compliance can contact the MOA to conduct independent testing and certification. Companies who pass these tests can then proudly state that their essential oil is of ISO quality and therefore is a true “Medicinal Grade” oil. Ethical companies will use this standard in their marketing literature. Oils produced only for fragrance need not apply.
I am a part of a different MLM essential oil company that I trust very much. They have their own “standard” of quality which makes sense to me. They are clear in their communications that the standard is developed by them but tested outside the company (independent verification of their standard). One of the things they measure is the quantity of the various constituents of each oil. My understanding from them and other sources is that the constituents do need to be at a particular level or within a particular range in order to produce the desired benefit. Is this also “junk science?”
Anyway, on to my question…I am basically interested in the most basic of oils. Peppermint, lavender, lemon or orange and possibly tea tree as my daughter has severe scalp (dandruff ?) issues. I also have recently started to make soap and am looking dor something natural yet affordable to scent them with. Where would u recommend I get these oils for this use?

Do they sell essential oils of plants that are endangered? There are quite a few companies that are harvesting and using essential oils of plants that are endangered. You should be asking where your essential oil has come from; is it “endangered” and is the supplier trying to sell you an inferior/substituted product in its place, claiming that it is the same “quality” and standard.  If it is extracted from an endangered plant species, what is the current level of threat to that plant species? Finally, is there an alternative essential oil, with similar chemical components and properties that you could be using? You can keep track of current endangered aromatic species on cropwatch.org


Today, the processors (distillers) of essential oils carefully blend proprietary mixtures of L. angustifolia subspecies and cultivars to produce a combination of true lavender oils that have a more consistent aroma, rather than providing only the low-camphor Reya and Munstead subspecies as specialized perfume ingredients. These other lavender essential oils are as true and pure as the two cultivars used by perfumers, but with four cultivars they provide a wider palette of scent and a more diverse scope of practical application due to their wider range of natural constituents.
The only oils on the market safe to ingest are by a company called Young Living. If you are not a member you can obtain Eucalyptus oil by typing in Young Living Essential Oil Eucalyptus on an ebay or amazon search engine to try it out. One you do, you will surely want to become a member of this company. I use these oils on myself and children and am being healed of YEARS of chronic illness with these products. I am not a salesperson. I feel obligated to get EVERYONE with health issues this REAL AND TRUE HEALING MEDICINE that heals rather than just treating symptoms.
Tomato Leaves are toxic, never ingest them or use for skincare products. Strictly aromatic purposes are okay, like candles, however, Tomato Leaf EO or Absolute is very expensive for such a venture. The fresh leaves loose their wonderful aroma once dried, I tried it already 🙂 Best choice will be a fragrance oil if you want to really capture that smell, I know…not natural, but these are the facts. Good luck!

The purity of an essential oil is its most important characteristic. An essential oil that isn’t pure means you run the risk of putting germs, heavy metals, or adulterants onto or into your body, which can provoke irritation, adverse effects, or even sickness. Without an accepted standard for essential oil quality, doTERRA created its own testing process, calling it CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade®. The CPTG process certifies that there are no added fillers, synthetic ingredients, or harmful contaminants in their essential oils that would reduce their efficacy. doTERRA even goes a step further, putting all their products and the packaging through a battery of tests to ensure a long and effective shelf-life. This protocol ensures potency, purity, and consistency batch to batch.
The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition.
"Synthetic essential oils may seem like a bargain," says Rupinder Mangat, CEO of Mevei. "It can be difficult to tell the difference between a synthetic oil or a real one. But be careful—chemically reconstructed oils seldom include all the trace chemicals that are found in the real plant. Price can be an indication that an oil is synthetically reproduced or extended."

Essential oils, however, are distilled and used not only in holistic aromatherapy, but as mentioned previously, are also distilled for use in the personal fragrancing, home fragrancing, cosmetic and in the food/beverage/flavoring industries. In these industries where purchasers of essential oils use them for mass production, there is far less need for "pure" essential oils and far greater need for consistent, standardized essential oils that do not change from shipment to shipment.
You can ingest some essential oils and there are good reasons to do so. If they’re awesome outside the body, perhaps they would be inside too? They’re antifungal, antiviral, antibacterial, etc. Of course you need to be careful and use good judgement. Too much of anything can be bad for you. Candy companies & chocolatiers have been doing it for ages and there’s no reason you can’t too. I’m off to make some lavender blueberry scones. Good morning!
If a bottle states not for ingestion or internal use, you should put the bottle down and walk away because there are toxic chemicals in it. You CAN and SHOULD be able to ingest your oils and is exactly why you should ONLY use therapeutic grade E.O’s. Things that go on your skin become absorbed into your bloodstream just the same as if you take it internally but it by passes the digestion process which means its even more important to make sure whatever you put on your skin is pesticide free, chemical free and natural.
As far back as A.D. 1000, healers used mechanical presses or steam to extract essential oils from fragrant plants. Today, practitioners can rub oil-infused lotions on the skin, where the compounds are absorbed into the bloodstream. Or they can diffuse them into the air where, once inhaled, they bind to smell receptors and stimulate the central nervous system, says Joie Power, PhD, a neuropsychologist and aromatherapist who has taught nurses how to use the oils for decades.
Because essential oils are obviously all-natural, it might be easy to assume that they're gentle and largely unreactive. This isn't the case at all—by definition, it's extremely potent stuff. "On average, they are up to 75 times more powerful than dried herbs," says Avery. As such, "essential oils must be handled with care." This means that a couple drops go a long way, and aside from very specific oils (more on that later), essential oils should always be diluted properly before applying them directly to skin. Whether or not essential oils should be ingested is actually a highly debated topic, and many argue that it isn't safe unless specifically advised by a doctor or expert.

The worst deception is when poor companies use synthetic fragrances mixed into vegetable oil and pass it off as true essential oil. This is where the real danger to your health can come: the National Academy of Sciences reported that the 95 percent of synthetic fragrances come from petroleum and have the potential to cause cancer, birth defects, central nervous system disorders and allergic reactions.
A few drops of lavender essential oil has many properties for body and mind. Lavender essential oil is gentle enough to be applied directly on the skin and is commonly used by massage therapists and naturopaths. Also, lavender essential oil provides beneficial properties for dry and sensitive skin, has soothing properties that help reduce stress and has calming effects that help induce sleep.
This is a must-have dietary or culinary oil, Febuary said. They both recommend starting your day with lemon water, using a drop of lemon oil and a tiny pinch of salt. Add a drop to savory foods like fish or chicken recipes that call for lemon juice, and use it to create vinaigrettes and marinades to add a bright flavor to summer salads and grilling.
To be an international help for consumer, the BDIH works together with five other organisations for natural cosmetic from France, Italy, Belgium and Great Britain to harmonise the different national standards. The result is the European Cosmos Standard which makes the standards and comparability. The national labels remain so the consumers recognize them.
First, we are not an MLM company and don’t need those outrageous margins to pay a bunch of middleman distributors. Second, ZEVA was founded by Dr. Tracy Gibbs, a world-renowned pharmacognosist who has dedicated his life to the study of chemistry, hematology and botanical medicine with a goal of finding the right balance of natural products that will enhance consumers’ lives and offer profitable business opportunities to retailers. Dr. Gibbs and the executive team at ZEVA Essential Oils are a group of hard-working, honest business professionals committed to offering only 100% ISO certified essential oils, so consumers can trust the products to be the highest quality, and consultants can have confidence in the products they sell.
Heavy Metal testing shows the amount of heavy metal content in the essential oil. When properly distilled, essential oils should not contain heavy metals. ICP-MS testing uses a high-energy medium called Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) to ionize the sample. The sample is then run through a mass spectroscope, which separates the sample into its elemental parts and provides a reading about which elements are present and at what quantities.
I have never used either YL or DoTerra and am not affiliated with either company but I have some very serious concerns about the claims made by YL and their representatives, as well as their owner/founder and his moral standing. There are disagreements within the aromatherapy industry as to how oils can and should be used but I know several QUALIFIED aromatherapists and they all advise that NOT all oils should be taken internally or applied undiluted directly to the skin.
Can you treat psoriasis with essential oils? Psoriasis is a common skin condition in which scaly plaque build up on the skin. There are some herbal oils that are said to have healing effects on patches of psoriasis. Learn how essential oils and natural remedies may be used to treat psoriasis. MNT also examines what psoriasis is and what its causes. Read now
Paula, I am no doctor, but taking fish oil, exercising, eating a very healthy diet (no sugar) and getting PLENTY of rest helped with my postpartum depression. Sunlight, being with loved ones and reminding myself to be kind and gentle to ME also helped. I turned to my faith. Sorry I couldn’t answer your question about the oil, but I humbly wanted to share a little advice and the suggestions are all safe for baby. Congrats, to you and your partner! It gets better, love.

I’ve been taking Aura Cacia lavender oil internally – a couple of drops sling with do terra lemon and peppermint in water – swishing then swallowing. Is it a bad idea for me to take the Aura Cacia internally like this? I’ve been completely ignorant! I’m doing this to stay away from pharmaceuticals so definitely don’t want to be causing any worse problems. Thanks in advance…
Some essential oils can be taken internally. The specific one I am thinking of is peppermint EO. It is known to treat IBS in several studies and can be taken also to combat headaches as well. Of course a topical application near the stomach and tummy is also known to be effect and application to the bottom of the feet can help reduce fever. I am currently in the process of making a guide based on symptoms to help people pick essential oils based on application.
At NOW® we’ve established long-standing relations with our essential oil vendors, and we purchase our oils in large quantities that qualify for bulk discounts, which we then pass on to consumers in the form of everyday low pricing. We also sell direct to retailers instead of going through distributors, which can add as much as 30% to a product’s cost.
The primary constituents are listed, but not in any proportion and I haven’t the foggiest what specific gravity, refractive index, or optical rotation levels are appropriate for what I’m doing (natural perfumery). Steffen Arctander’s “Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin” is a big help overall, but I was wondering if you could comment on this.

Or most important goal is to maintain the consistent quality of all our products. This has been proven in tests conducted by independent institutes throughout Germany. Tested TAOASIS products have received the highest rating from both the consumer organisation Stiftung Warentest and the magazine Ökotest! Aromacosmetic products are produced in accordance with the strict guidelines for natural cosmetics. We work in compliance with the GMP standard for medicines and pharmaceuticals and have been ISO 9001:2008 certified since 2002.
* Disclaimer: The entire contents of this website are based upon the opinions of Dr. Axe, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective author, who retains copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Axe and his community. Dr. Axe encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.
You are really uneducated in the use of essential oils. doTERRA essential oils are safe and that is proven with much research. Check out pubmed.gov and what it states on doTerra science. Let’s see…would statements at all be there if there was a danger? There are no dangers in using doTERRA Essential OILs… almost 2 million regular users would agree. Some of the companies mentioned have under 200 users which does not lead to credibility and no science to back them. The FDA has issued NO statements besides the fact that wellness advocates should not make claims on a few items…including major disease processes, even if an essential oil can assist…it just can’t be claimed online. Speak to the many Children’s Hospitals, Trauma Centers and hundreds of MD’s that regularly use doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS on patients. Theres your proof!
Yes, many companies do GC/MS testing and infrared. The real test is, what do they compare the results to and what is that company’s standard for what a good oil is? If their standard is high, then they may reject oils which are below that standard. If their standard is not so high, then they will accept and sell more oils, even ones that have been rejected by a company with higher standards.
 As one of the largest suppliers of Lavender Oil in the USA we believe that we offer the best prices and service in the industry. We do realize that many people aren't interested in switching suppliers though so we put together some tips to assist you when buying your oils. First make sure that you deal with a reputable supplier. Essential oils are one of the easiest and most common items that suppliers cheat on. Very often they cut their oils with a much cheaper carrier. This saves them big money and allows them to sell their product far below market prices. However you end up buying a watered down product that ends up costing much more in the long run. By staying clear of smaller less reputable suppliers you can protect yourself. Second, ask for a C of A for any oils that you purchase. Even though you feel like you are buying from a reputable supplier, it still might be tempting for them to try to cheat and make more money off you. Don't simply buy from a company because their prices are higher. That doesn't always mean they have a better quality. We can honestly say that our essential oils are absolute top quality and have the C of A's to back it up. We simply sell at wholesale prices because we are a high volume importer.
Mass Spectrometry is used together with Gas Chromatography to further determine the composition of an essential oil. In Mass Spectrometry, the constituents previously separated by GC are ionized and sent through a series of magnetic fields. Using molecular weight and charge, the amount of each constituent can be identified, providing additional insights into the potency of the essential oil.
Thanks for this article! I’m glad that there are balancing voices out there to educate people about what is right and what is wrong. I’ve heard of too many BS from people who don’t do their research before spreading and sharing any advises, and most of them don’t care about the fact that they don’t even have the most basic training or education on aromatherapy! That’s simply irresponsible to me.
The only oils on the market safe to ingest are by a company called Young Living. If you are not a member you can obtain Eucalyptus oil by typing in Young Living Essential Oil Eucalyptus on an ebay or amazon search engine to try it out. One you do, you will surely want to become a member of this company. I use these oils on myself and children and am being healed of YEARS of chronic illness with these products. I am not a salesperson. I feel obligated to get EVERYONE with health issues this REAL AND TRUE HEALING MEDICINE that heals rather than just treating symptoms.

Not only is there no evidence that any essential oil can help with vision problems, age-related or otherwise, but placing any essential oil “in the eye” is extremely dangerous advice. Almost any undiluted essential oil coming into contact with the ocular membranes will be corrosive, possibly causing scarring of the cornea, and certainly causing significant pain.

Thank you Holly! I’m happy to see someone stand up and clarify the fact that doTerra does stand behind their oils. To state such a statement of an oil to 100% certified pure therapeutic grade does mean something….especially is you consider using them internally or for cooking. If you are considering using essential oils instead of over the counter drugs, which contain many chemical ingredients (by the way, they use the same plants to create their drugs only they change them chemically and add other things), why not go all the way and eliminate ALL toxic and chemical additions to your body?? My suggestion, do your homework and research! Don’t take someone’s word for it in a comment. Buy a few bottles of the same oil (I hope you’ll consider doTerra) and compare how you feel.
Rebecca – Wintergreen oil is 96-99% methyl salicylate, and neither the oil nor the compound is listed under GRAS (generally recognized as safe) or FA (permitted food additive). However, it is on a list of indirect food additives (substances that are permitted to be present in trace amounts only, and not added intentionally), as a constituent of adhesives used in food packaging.
Typical research studies involve testing two groups-one group gets an experimental substance and another group gets a placebo substance (this group is referred to as the "control" group). When using aromatic substances, it is very difficult to conduct a blinded study. Some researchers have used masks or other barriers to blind participants. Other researchers have used alternate scents assumed to have no therapeutic properties as controls. These approaches are problematic, however, because people associate smells with past experiences. Thus, it is difficult to account for individual variation in how essential oils affect people.
We’re having a problem at our apartment that we fear may be bedbugs, and I’m following a recipe to make a topical treatment that is supposed to protect me from being bitten–since I’m one of those unlucky 30% who are sensitive to their bites–while we undergo whatever steps necessary to rid the premises of the pests. It calls for six drops each of lemongrass oil and tea tree oil, and 10 each of lavender and thyme, in a quarter cup of almond oil. I’m supposed to apply it before bed, but I’m wondering how safe it is to apply on, say, the face, since the insects target any exposed skin, and that’s one of the few areas I can’t really cover. Any knowledge on the matter would be appreciated.
I learned from reading a FAQ for Beeyoutiful Essential Oils that the reason for smaller essential oils companies labeling their essential oils “not for internal consumption” and are able to price their oils at a much lower price than many of the MLM  companies is because of insurance costs. The only way to get a label on their bottles without the “not for internal consumption” words printed on it, is for the company to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on insurance and training programs/literature. This is the reason for such a high price and such a small bottle. A bottle labeled as such is not necessarily a lower quality essential oil, the company just couldn't or didn't want to purchase the high price tag insurance that goes along with labeling for internal consumption.
In the United States, herbal products are considered dietary supplements, and unlike drugs they do not need approval by the Food and Drug Administration before they come to market. However, the FDA can take action to recall a product if it is found to be unsafe after it hits the market. (in other words, THAT is how companies can put other things in herbal supplements without telling you)

Amy, organic crops may be contaminated by pesticides from nearby farms, but 100% organic is not impossible, and contamination is the exception. Distillation probably does reduce the proportion of a biocide, but most of them do carry over and will be present in the corresponding essential oil, usually in the 1-10 ppm range. You will get very much more biocide into your body by eating non-organic foods than you ever could from a few drops of essential oil containing 2 ppm of a biocide. Getting back to your question, most certified organic essential oils are biocide-free, but some may contain biocides, and the only way to be sure is to analyze the oils. The presence of a biocide would be regarded as a contaminant, not an adulterant. (An adulterant is a substance intentionally added for profit reasons.) The bottom line is that a certified organic oil is, on average, very much lower in biocide contamination than one that is not certified. Having said that, some oils are biocide-free but are not certified. You might find this website helpful: http://www.ifoam.org/about_ifoam/standards/index.html

No point on your feet, sweat glands on your feet, nothing that would actually absorb, only thing you are doing by putting it on your feet is inhaling it as you put it on your feet, but you are already doing that putting it on your chest, why waste it. Just google are there pores on your feet–dermatologist articles all over saying bottom line just what I said.
In the United States, aromatherapy is regulated by how it is intended for use: cosmetic, drug, fragrance, food additive for consumption, or “something else.” Therefore, if a claim is made by any natural substance or an essential oil that makes it appear as a drug, and it hasn’t gone through the FDA approval process for this, the claim is in violation of the drug standards. (This does not imply that the oil itself is unsafe, rather, that the proper protocol for approval was not adhered to.)
Good question. I wonder what the moisture content of the estimated weights are (HUGE difference as water makes up the majority of a plants’ weight). Nevertheless, I would guess that the environmental impact is minimal to none as most of these plants are numerous compared to harvesting other plants such as hardwoods, rain forest plants, and even corn. Take lavender for example, if it takes 100 lbs to extract 1 lb, that is barely nothing when you consider that lavender grows wild and is abundant. One acre of lavender would probably produce over a ton of plant parts in one mowing for oil extraction (I am guessing based on my experience with a variety of different plant “harvesting”). And it grows fast. To compare weight, imagine mowing a one acre field of mixed weeds 3 ft tall down to 6 inches, you would have a few thousand pounds of plants that would quickly and naturally grow back in a couple weeks. The rose petals are at the extreme ratio but are expensive and used far less than the common oils.
I work for an MD and upon seeing it he’s taking out his Rx pad. I told him I wanted to try this first and if I had trouble I would call. The hand was all swollen when he saw it in the AM, but by that evening when he came back the swelling had gone down. Because he believes in toxic drugs, he wouldn’t say anything the remarkable response I was getting.
To find a therapeutic grade essential oil you will need to know its latin name and find it back on the bottle. The bottle also needs to have the name and address of the aupplier and a batch number. It is really not advised to use less than therapeutic grade in any skin, beauty or healthcare products as you are so much more likely to get adverse effects.
You said that YL and other MLM companies buy some of their oils from other suppliers. YL’s promotional DVDs and literature make viewers believe that everything in their bottles is in their control from “seed to seal.” However, upon closer inspection of one of their manuals, I do see references to their purchases from other distillers (upon whom they put high standards). YL stresses the importance of such things as the precise timing of harvesting plants (even to the time of day), and the timing in distilling plants (and heat/pressure used). They deem all these things as absolutely vital to making a high quality, “therepeutic” essential oil.

The first thing to look for to determine essential oil authenticity is that each oil is identified with the plant’s scientific or botanical name, and in appropriate cases, the chemotype. A chemotype is when the same plant, e.g. rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), will have a different chemical profile based on where it is grown. Only some plants have chemotypes. Country of plant origin, extraction process used, and either a distillation or expiration date are also important.
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Oh, and there’s no such thing as “Therapeutic grade” essential oils.  All that means is oils that haven’t been adulterated by adding carrier oils, etc. to them.  It’s a marketing ploy to make the oils seem purer than they are.  Really, “pure” essential oils are the bottom level of purity/safety.  Wilfcrafted and organic are the safest and most beneficial.
So, between their “extra” or more extensive methods of testing, their control over growth and harvest, the use of their own labs and equipment (which Gary Young states are the only instruments in the world that are matched and calibrated to the instruments used at the National Center for Scientific Research in France), YL openly declares that their oils are “therapeutic” grade and no other oils but their own are fully safe to be used neat or internally.
Lavender oil is claimed to have a slew of a health benefits, with aromatherapy practitioners using it for anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, depression, headache, upset stomach and hair loss. Some small studies on using lavender for anxiety have yielded mixed results, and some studies suggest the oil may work in combination with other oils to fight a hair-loss condition called alopecia areata, according to the NIH. However, "there is little scientific evidence of lavender's effectiveness for most health uses," the NIH says.
I did purchase this item from Amazon. It was delivered on September 11th. For some reason, the button to write a review is not there, but I feel that I must do so anyway because I dislike this product that much. No issues with anything but the smell. It smells terrible. I mean TERRIBLE. I've been using vetiver in my essential oil calming spray formula for about 8 months now. The brand that I usually buy was out of stock and I really needed the oil, so I decided to try this one. It smells like old lady perfume (no offense to old ladies). Really, really strong old lady perfume. My house still stinks from the batch I made yesterday. I can't believe how different this smells from my regular brand. And it's not the "every batch/kind is different" reason either. Every single batch I've received from the other manufacturer has smelled the same. The smell of this product is not right at all. Do what you will with this information. I just felt the need to share my opinion. Thanks.
To be clear, contamination or adulteration - whatever you want to call it - happens. It's happened with almonds, spinach, protein powders, supplements and seemingly daily with processed food. Obviously, we'd hope the brands we know and trust have systems worked out to ensure this doesn't happen. But sometimes it does. The important thing to pay attention to when it does happen is how the company handles it. Do they own it, take responsibility, and put motions in place to improve, telling their customers how they are going to do better? Or do they deny it and start placing blame elsewhere?
I am confused on your list of EOs to avoid while nursing or pregnant. Many of these oils I have never heard being issues. I use Lemon oil regularly and ginger as well, as a nursing mother. Could you perhaps list effects of each oil for breastfeeding mothers ? I know peppermint reduces production but confused on most of the others…. you listed ” Aniseed, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, ginger, jasmine, lemon, nutmeg, rosemary, sage” I use several on this list currently and was about to put in a YL order for clary sage

I stumbled on this page and have found it really useful. Just wonder if you could help – I’m thinking of making some homemade lotion bars made with beeswax, shea butter and coconut oil. I’d like to use Sweet Orange essential oil for a Christmassy smell, how many drops would be safe to use? I have found one recipe which uses 50 drops of lavendar (where the recipe uses around 1cup of each of the ingredients), would I be able to use this amount of the orange?
Aromatherapy is an ancient practice of natural healing and plant medicine that has been documented in human civilizations around the world for over 6,000 years. The use of prescribing aromatic plant extracts for massage, for bathing and for mental, emotional and spiritual imbalances has proven benefits through both practical and scientific evidence.
The only types of essential oils that should EVER be used are THERAPEUTIC GRADE essential oils. Otherwise, all the benefits of the essential oils are lost to the SYNTHETIC PETROCHEMICALS that are in MOST essential oils (even the ones you get at the health food store… I wont name brands)There are only two name brands that I know of that sell therapeutic grade essential oils.(there could be more) Those brands are Young Living ( Which I highly recommend) and Doterra. More expensive does mean better. Young Living does not sell any of its oils to any other company. There are only a handful of distilleries in the world that’s why most E.O’s are poor imitators. They are not all getting the oils from the same place. They are made in a lab instead.
What nutrients? What cells? Essential oils do not contain nutrients – they contain no vitamins, minerals, proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, or any other type of nutrient. I have never seen any research that pertains to essential oils delivering nutrients to cells. Essential oil constituents have been used to enhance percutaneous absorption of pharmaceuticals, delivering them via the skin into the blood. But this pertains neither to nutrients nor cells. So the statement makes no sense.
Hi Robert – I know I’ve read that more than a few times in some of the main stream aromatherapy books and think I was told that in my aromatherapy classes – about the 2% thing. So, it is a perception that I myself also have and have, therefore, spent long hours trying to determine if my sources are selling me what they say they are and who my sources should be – long hours and dollars spent to attend conferences to rub elbows with those who should know. However, at that time in 2006, organic essential oils were not readily or at all available. I have also read and have been told by those who should know, that just because an oil is certified organic, there is still no guarantee that said essential oil is not adulterated or for that matter really organic. The argument that I was given was that no one stays around to make sure that the material actually placed into the still was the same that was grown in the organic soil. We live in a world of distrust and for good reason as we look around at the greed in high places. I know this doesn’t address your issues about your article but was and always will be interested in any discussion concerning what constitutes an unadulterated oil. That being said, I would think there are certain things to consider when purchasing an oil and the chances it may or may not be adulterated. Some oils are naturally inexpensive and there would be nothing gained by adulterating them. If you look at how many acres of a particular oil are said to have been grown for a particular year and for that same year there was a great more essential oil sold than could have been produced – then you know you probably have an issue. I know that you know far more about this issue than I do, but I would like to see more discussion concerning what things would throw up a red flag when purchasing an oil from a particular supplier. The internet is now so absolutely full of people selling essential oils and copying and pasting the same old information that it is a bit overwhelming. My concern is the same as other clinical aromatherapists and that is that people will try a particular oil, find that it doesn’t work because it is either adulterated or the person selling the oil really doesn’t have a clue which oil or chemotype should be used for a particular purpose, so the client then assumes that any and all claims made by the aromatherapy industry are false or vastly overstated. This is true in research studies that have been done as well. Is there an answer? I would like to see an article by someone as knowledgeable as yourself that gives you a list of possible red flags and things to consider when looking for suppliers, particularly bulk suppliers.

Hi! Is it necessary to dilute an oil if you’re going to inhale the vapor, rather than use it topically? I’m asking because I had been rubbing a drop of frankincense on the palms of my hands and then inhaling to treat asthma. After awhile, I developed a reaction on my skin. Now I’m applying the oil to a piece of paper in a ziploc bag and inhaling from that to avoid skin contact.
Beyond experiencing great results with their oils, I happen to like network marketing and have been involved with a few companies in the past. My experience of doTERRA is that there is less hype than with others. There is enthusiasm and dedication which could be seen as “hype,” and they do have a pretty incredible story with a lot of pride in their product.
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Delivering the freshest product with the highest level of quality control is our top priority, and as a result we only have a small portion of finished product on-hand at any given time. Additionally, growers who produce plants that are both Certified Organic and up to our personal standards are exceedingly rare, and the few growers we’re lucky enough to work with can only produce so much raw material at a time.
I prefer Appalachian valley — they are a wholesale distributor as well but you can purchase small quantities from them as well. Use the code – roseotto and you can get their wholesale prices. If you purchase 5, 10, or 20ml bottles when you add them to the cart you will see a discount. I really love their products and got a sample of their frankincense – wow!! Love it.
I’ve been taking Aura Cacia lavender oil internally – a couple of drops sling with do terra lemon and peppermint in water – swishing then swallowing. Is it a bad idea for me to take the Aura Cacia internally like this? I’ve been completely ignorant! I’m doing this to stay away from pharmaceuticals so definitely don’t want to be causing any worse problems. Thanks in advance…
As far back as A.D. 1000, healers used mechanical presses or steam to extract essential oils from fragrant plants. Today, practitioners can rub oil-infused lotions on the skin, where the compounds are absorbed into the bloodstream. Or they can diffuse them into the air where, once inhaled, they bind to smell receptors and stimulate the central nervous system, says Joie Power, PhD, a neuropsychologist and aromatherapist who has taught nurses how to use the oils for decades.
Paula, I am no doctor, but taking fish oil, exercising, eating a very healthy diet (no sugar) and getting PLENTY of rest helped with my postpartum depression. Sunlight, being with loved ones and reminding myself to be kind and gentle to ME also helped. I turned to my faith. Sorry I couldn’t answer your question about the oil, but I humbly wanted to share a little advice and the suggestions are all safe for baby. Congrats, to you and your partner! It gets better, love.

I just started working with doTERRA EOs….Last night I tried a glass of water with one drop of lemon and one of lime to curb a sweet craving. I woke up with terrible heart burn and it’s been bad all day. I’ve never had stomach acid shooting up into my esophagus before. It’s very painful. I’m burping and getting loads or burning… Is there anything i can do? I thought they were safe to ingest…
The ISO/AFNOR standard for lavender essential oil recommends two cultivars used to meet the specific needs of perfume manufacturers. Their recommended composition of lavender oil favors the low camphor Reya and Munstead types for fine fragrance use precisely because these do not have the depth, nor complexity of constituents, that other legitimate lavender oils commonly used in aromatherapy have. That standard notably does not allow the use of all four of the major cultivars of Lavandula angustifolia (formerly known as Lavandula officinalis) used by aromatherapists: the Vera, Munstead, Silver and Raya cultivars. It also excludes many minor subspecies of L. angustifolia.
Amanda, I don’t know what your qualification is to make such a bold statement. MANY, MANY, MANY, MANY people use Young Living oils internally WITHOUT adverse side effects and WITHOUT burning their esophagus or hurting their gut flora, in fact it improves gut flora if you know what oils to use. Oils ingested are usually done so via a veggie capsule or can be mixed with water or Young Living’s NingXia Red. I myself ingest YLEOs on a daily basis and have been able to get off my proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) medication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which was causing the nice side effect of osteopenia (pre osteoporosis). If you know what you’re doing and do the research, oils are extremely beneficial without nasty side effects. Yes, I am a YL distributor, but I became one after using the oils for a while myself and on my pets and seeing great improvement in our situation. Hope that clears up the ingestion issue for you.

Most common essential oils such as lavender, peppermint, tea tree oil, patchouli, and eucalyptus are distilled. Raw plant material, consisting of the flowers, leaves, wood, bark, roots, seeds, or peel, is put into an alembic (distillation apparatus) over water. As the water is heated, the steam passes through the plant material, vaporizing the volatile compounds. The vapors flow through a coil, where they condense back to liquid, which is then collected in the receiving vessel.
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