The Medicinal Oil Association (MOA) was founded to be an independent quality control regulating body for the essential oil industry. It was founded by Dr Jed Adamson ND and Dr Tracy Gibbs PhD. The popularity of and wide spread use of essential oils is similar to the growth of the dietary supplement industry in the early 1990’s but today, just as then, there is no regulatory body to determine safety, purity or misuse of essential oils.
Great article! I like the way everything is explained in detail. I love essential oils and use few kinds for aromatherapy, but the thing I always wanted to do is to include essential oils in my homemade cleaning solutions. In your article I found all the information and advices I needed, so now I already can use essential oils for cleaning too. Thank you for the hints!
Your access to the NCBI website at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov has been temporarily blocked due to a possible misuse/abuse situation involving your site. This is not an indication of a security issue such as a virus or attack. It could be something as simple as a run away script or learning how to better use E-utilities, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK25497/, for more efficient work such that your work does not impact the ability of other researchers to also use our site. To restore access and understand how to better interact with our site to avoid this in the future, please have your system administrator contact info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
First and foremost, the grading systems companies use to grade their products are all relative because there is no regulation of the grades. So when it says "therapeutic grade", that just means it's that companies idea of therapeutic grade. That's not to say they are misrepresenting their products, but there will be variance between products because there is no standard, so finding a brand you trust is important.
No, it’s not true that “other” essential oils are harmful, and should not be used internally or externally! Has someone told you that there is something impure about certified organic essential oils? Both Young Living and Do Terra buy many of their essential oils from the same industry suppliers that some of the companies listed above buy from. How do I know? Because I have been in the industry since 1974, and suppliers talk. And anyway, there are only so many producers of certain oils.

Wonderful information! I just started researching oils and I want to use him for my classroom I’ve also wondered about using them around my cats I know some essential oils are not safe for cats I would never put them on topically, however I diffuse them in my bedroom and they sleep with me Do you have any insight on this topic? Thanks again for such great information !!
DoTerra and Young Living are both Multi Level Marketing companies, making the oils more expensive. All pure essential oils are therapeutic. Young Living tried to copyright the term to set them apart. DoTerra is run by people who left Young Living. These two companies, as well as many others, get their oils from the same suppliers. They make their own blends, but there are some standard blends that are very similar from company to company. Ingesting oils is not necessary because they are so easily absorbed through the skin. I get my oils from a smaller company who uses the same suppliers and I get a lot more for my money!
I have been bothered by yeast infections in past yrs(vaginal) knowing that most essential oils have antibacterial properties I did the following; In 1 cup bottled water I put 8 to 10 drops Rosemary essential oil, stirred it up, wet a washcloth with it and bathed the area. I had immeadiate relief from the horrible itching. If it came back do it again..It only took 2 treatments for me. that was a Godsend to me.
Think about this for a moment – the aromatherapy industry is not the only user of essential oils. In fact, aromatherapy accounts for a very small percentage. The majority of essential oils produced end up in food flavouring, pharmaceutical, perfumery and personal care and these essential oils are usually modified to meet the standards required for each of these industries.
In our scent tests the Stillpoint’s oils started off smelling mild and fresh, but then after a minute or two they magically blossomed and became very rich, deep, vibrant, stronger and more clear; almost like a fine wine opens up after being uncorked for some time. And for those who may be sensitive to subtle energies, these oils possessed a very clean and high vibration, which is an enormous benefit when using the oils for spiritual practice. No other oils we tested performed this way.
What I found most impressive is that they control their product right from the very botanical seeds; cultivating, harvesting and distilling many of their essential oils right on their very own farms across the world. This gives Young Living the unique ability to verify their quality standards at every step of the process. For more information on this, check out their proprietary Seed to Seal production process.
Thank you so much for posting this. I had a reaction to my pure, therapeutic grade Frankincense on my skin and it left me with an itchy rash for over a week. It left me really wondering about the claims the MLM supporters make. I have had great experience in using my oils, but it is foolish to claim they can do no harm. I really appreciate a scientist’s take on all of this.
Disclosure: I have chosen not to disclose the company I was in contact with as I don't think it's particularly important. I want to leave it to you to ask the questions and get answers that make sense for you. I am by no means an essential oil expert and so I rely heavily on the decades of experience of the experts that I work with and consulted with for this article.  I am an affiliate of an essential oil company that I trust.  I am not using my affiliate link or naming names in this article as my intention is not to profit off sharing this information but to empower you to really dig in and find your own answers so that you can use oils you trust as part of your healthy life.
I tested grapefruit oil from Eden’s Garden, tea tree oil from Tea Tree Therapy, and vetiver oil from Nature’s Kiss brand (I think the tea tree oil I bought in a natural food store and the other brands from Amazon?), all on the same strip of yellow construction paper. After 20 minutes, there is a huge oily spot from the Nature’s Kiss oil (and looking at the label, I can see now it is embarrassingly low quality production as it looks sort of cheaply homemade- don’t recommend ever buying that brand if you see it). The Tea Tree Therapy spot is smaller and a little lighter, but still definitely an oily stain. The smallest, lightest one is the Eden’s Garden grapefruit spot, which I’m sort of glad about considering most of my oils are that brand, but I can still definitely see where it was dropped. I can’t really imagine an oil not leaving any spot behind at all, but if I ever find one that does, I would be very impressed.
Aromatic use: Our sense of smell is a powerful one! Essential oils are quickly absorbed by smell receptors, and can influence our physiological, mental and emotional states. Some essential oils have uplifting effects, while others have energizing or calming effects. Diffusion is one of the easiest ways to use essential oils aromatically; however, as mentioned earlier, you don’t have to have a diffuser to enjoy the aroma of essential oils.

At NOW® we’ve established long-standing relations with our essential oil vendors, and we purchase our oils in large quantities that qualify for bulk discounts, which we then pass on to consumers in the form of everyday low pricing. We also sell direct to retailers instead of going through distributors, which can add as much as 30% to a product’s cost.
Tomato Leaves are toxic, never ingest them or use for skincare products. Strictly aromatic purposes are okay, like candles, however, Tomato Leaf EO or Absolute is very expensive for such a venture. The fresh leaves loose their wonderful aroma once dried, I tried it already 🙂 Best choice will be a fragrance oil if you want to really capture that smell, I know…not natural, but these are the facts. Good luck!
MODIFICATIONS. Company may, in its sole discretion and without prior notice, (a) revise this Agreement; (b) revise the labelling or modify the ingredients or formula of any Products; and (c) discontinue the Website or any Products at any time.  Company shall post any revision to this Agreement to the Website, and the revision shall be effective immediately on such posting. You agree to review this Agreement and other online policies posted on the Website periodically to be aware of any revisions. You agree that, by continuing to use or access the Website following notice of any revision, you shall abide by any such revision.
Examples of these types of essence include:  Cajeput (White Tea Tree), Cedar Leaf, Cinnamon Leaf, Eucalyptus Blue Gum, Eucalyptus Blue Mallee, Eucalyptus (Mint), True Eucalyptus, Laurel Leaf (pictured), Tea Tree, Mandarin Petitgrain,  Lime Petitgrain, Orange Petitgrain, Manuka, Magnolia Leaf, Niaouli, Nerolina, Rosalina, Purple Sage and White Sage.

One of my biggest frustrations of late has been a MLM company, I won’t name names and start a whole “thing”, but they state that they have a patent on “certified therapeutic grade”. In actuality, if you research the information, the only thing that is patented, is the logo that states “certified therapeutic grade”. It has nothing to do with the actual product, just the advertising.
In the article above this blog there is a link that will take you to 19 essential oils that can be used on babies and children. I looked at it, and the URL is http://www.abundanthealth4u.com Everything I have read about using essential oils on children stresses the importance of proper dilution. Be careful if you decide you want to do this. The word “therapeutic” is tossed around like pizza dough, and it really doesn’t have a scientific meaning when applied to EO’s.
Essential oils aren’t created with carrier oils – they’re extracted using a variety of methods. The most common are cold-pressing and steam distillation. Most citrus oils are cold-pressed (the name is pretty self-explanatory: they’re pressed), but almost all other essential oils are steam-distilled: the plant matter is placed above steaming hot water, the steam takes essential oil from the plant, and travels through a condenser. After condensing, you’re left with water and a tiiiiiny bit of essential oil floating on top.
What is your views on Organic Infusions, if any. I have been using there EO’s for a little over a year and do like them alot. When I first started using oils I did try do terra but there oils seem to have a certain similiar smell, almost as if something was added. I’m not sure why my senses picked that up. I did do some research where I found out they did use a marketing tool to sell products. That being said, the sellers of Organic Infusions never once bashed do terra. They did tell me to try different EO’s and find what works best for me and so far I’ve been happy with their oils.
Hey! I akso struggle with acne of all sorts. The best thing I have found is tea tree oil and lavender. I used to dilute it in jojoba oil and that worked great, but not fast enough for my upcoming wedding, so I dilute it in water now until it clears up. The tea tree oil is great for skin and the lavender helps with the redness and inflammation.but, the best thing you can do for your acne is drink lots of water, green tea, and dilluted ACV, exercise, and cut out processed foods, starting with refined sugar.

Heavy Metal testing shows the amount of heavy metal content in the essential oil. When properly distilled, essential oils should not contain heavy metals. ICP-MS testing uses a high-energy medium called Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) to ionize the sample. The sample is then run through a mass spectroscope, which separates the sample into its elemental parts and provides a reading about which elements are present and at what quantities.


Use the tips within AromaWeb's How to Buy Essential Oils article to guide you on what to look for when considering suppliers. Companies that use the terms "therapeutic grade" and "aromatherapy grade" may simply be trying to quickly convey to you that their oils were carefully chosen and tested for use by those practicing holistic aromatherapy. Some companies still have no idea that these terms are confusing.

It's not an instant favorite (unlike Artemisia pallens and Inula graveolens), although I typically grow to like EO's once my body has had a chance to think them over and assimilate the new information. I gave it 5 stars for three reasons: It is unbelievably intense and lasting, which is how it is described around the web. It smells nothing like valerian, which I've heard people complaining gets substituted for the more-expensive vetiver. I've smelled a lot of valerian, and I just don't detect any of that here, so I'd say this hasn't been cut with anything. And despite washing with (unscented) soap and rinsing with isopropyl alcohol, the fragrance has not changed, it has only gotten a little weaker--I can't stand scents that change when they are watered down.
One of the keys to producing the highest quality essential oils is to have the highest quality growing conditions for the plants prior to extraction. For that reason, ZEVA focuses on sourcing our plants from indigenous regions where the growing conditions are ideal for the plants, rather than trying to force them to grow in a non-native, less hospitable environment. Our team works with suppliers from around the world to find the highest quality ingredients to go into every essential oil we produce.
Young Living is a legit company, though their founder has been in a bit of trouble and maybe isn’t of the best moral character, thus Dr. Pappas’ last comments on oil myth #10. (The story is out there. It may take a bit of searching to find it if interested) Young Living has spent a lot of their energy bashing your favorite brand in hopes to destroy their reputation, also speaking volumes about the character of the company and many of their reps.
“USE ESSENTIAL OILS TO HELP YOUR MOOD. Lavender, peppermint, grapefruit, chamomile, lemon, ylang-ylang all help produce happy, joyous moods. Clary sage helps with PMS (although there have been reports that overuse of clary sage can lead to intoxication). Rosemary increases focus and concentration. Don’t forget the mood benefits of essential oils. Here’s an information packed aromatherapy reference chart to refer to.”
ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is an independent, international standard standing organization headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland that promotes the development of standards in the areas of intellectual, scientific, technological and commercial activity. For essential oils, ISO provides guidelines for packaging, conditioning, storage, labeling, sampling, testing and quality standards for individual essential oils.
Only pesticide residues that are hydrophilic, thermostable, and volatile can be carried over into an essential oil during distillation. Few pesticides possess these characteristics, so pesticide levels found in distilled oils are typically insignificant. In one large database, out of 73,541 analytical results on distilled essential oils, only 0.55% had positive results for pesticide detection.

There is a Cinnamon essential oil, however the flavoring kind you get at a grocery store is not an essential oil in that it isn’t therapeutic grade so it has no therapeutic benefits. Many of these are made with synthetic oils (though not all of them) that just taste like what you want and all of these kind of oils have lots of filler oil like the sunflower oil. This does make it ok that you are using so much though. 🙂 If it were real therapeutic grade essential oil that much of it would be such a strongly concentrated flavor that you’d cut back to a drop or two really quick. It also would be an unsafe health choice to take such a large dose of any therapeutic grade oil no matter the type, source, or purity. I do hope that it helps anyway, but I can vouch for the pure therapeutic grade cinnamon along with lemon EO helping control my blood sugar levels. I love essential oils. Aren’t they great?


Essential oils were once a small market product available mainly through trained aromatherapists and medicine men and women. With the massive production scale we are now seeing in oils, many are being grown as mono-crops requiring heavy amounts of pesticides, mass harvesting and in some cases irresponsible harvesting. This can both endanger plant species and hike the prices.
AFNOR (Association Francaise de Normalisation) Their "New Approach" provides directives and standards for members of the European Union states to facilitate intra-community trade. All companies wishing to exchange goods within Europe are therefore obliged to comply with their directives. For essential oils, they provide guidelines and information on various topics including determination of water content, chromatographic profiles, determination of acid value, content of phenols, etc.

Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, WE DO NOT MONITOR REVIEWS FOR ACCURATE INFORMATION. WE STRONGLY INSIST THAT YOU DO NOT TAKE MEDICAL ADVICE FROM ANY REVIEWS OR ASSUME THAT A PRODUCT WILL WORK THE SAME FOR YOU AS IT DID FOR OTHERS. Every consumer is different, circumstances vary and interpretations of results vary. These reviews allow consumers to share their experience with products but WE DO NOT VERIFY THE LEGITIMACY OF REVIEWS. These reviews are not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. BulkApothecary.com assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products in these reviews.


On speaking to Karen Menehan and Stanford Erickson, two of your editors, I was told that one role of a publication was to present alternative viewpoints. A fair point in principle, but I have read dozens of editorials, guest and otherwise, and don’t remember a single one that presented opposing views in this way. And, I’m still confused as to how my article was listed as someone else’s.
Never use an undiluted essential oil on a baby or child. Children have much thinner, more delicate skin than adults have, and tend to be very sensitive to the potency of essential oils. In fact, even if you do use essential oil in a recipe for children, only use half of the essential oil recommended in the recipe. That’s all they’ll need, anyway. (Here is a list of 19 essential oils that are safe for babies and children.)

I personally have a number of Aura Cacia's oils that I bought prior to really digging into oils.  I can't say anything except for my personal experience which is that they don't smell as potent as some of the other oils that I have.  I do like the company and I purchase from Frontier Co op regularly, but I'm not choosing to get my oils from them.   That being said, I think that they have a lot of great information about oils and their use.

In many industries (healthcare, agriculture, etc., as you are probably very familiar), there are Independent Certification Bodies, Accreditation Services, that are generally not-for-profit and independent—watchdogs who make sure that what companies say is happening is actually happening.  With every certification there are specific parameters that the product must meet: So for instance, in the US, the USDA sets the standards for organic agriculture, and any certifying bodies must be approved by the USDA to be credible. This system creates multiple levels of independent evaluation—and a company can't just claim that its products are organic, at least on packaging, unless it's been certified so by this system of certification. 
Lortscher says that the purity of different EO’s can vary widely, based on the degree of concentration and where they’re sourced from. "On top of that, the quality of your oils can be affected by adulteration (the purposeful addition of foreign substances), unintentional contamination, inadequate production, or improper storage conditions," he says. "If you keep an essential oil exposed to bright sunlight or oxygen, the composition of the oil can change. It’s best to store them in a cool, dark place."
dōTERRA essential oils was founded in 2008 by a group of health-care and business professionals, some of which used to work at Young Living. The founders all shared profound personal experiences with the life-enhancing benefits of essential oils. As per their mission statement, they strive to “bring a new standard of therapeutic-grade essential oils to the world”.
One very public example of this came in September of 2014 when the FDA cited both dōTERRA and Young Living, multi-level marketing essential oil companies. FDA agents found clear evidence that some of Young Living and dōTERRA reps were making claims that their oils could prevent and cure Ebola and many other illnesses! The situation was quickly remedied.
We found that boswellic acids contents depended on hydrodistillation duration and temperature (Table? 2). Essential oils prepared from longer distillation time and higher distillation temperature contained greater amounts of boswellic acids. For example, boswellic acids contents in Fractions III (19.6%) and IV (30.1%) were higher than those detected in Fraction I (0.9%) or II (0.8%) essential oil.
The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? It’s important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by companies selling oils and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgments about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
Rebecca – Wintergreen oil is 96-99% methyl salicylate, and neither the oil nor the compound is listed under GRAS (generally recognized as safe) or FA (permitted food additive). However, it is on a list of indirect food additives (substances that are permitted to be present in trace amounts only, and not added intentionally), as a constituent of adhesives used in food packaging.
There are several EO blends or normal oils that are safe, like oregano. There are others that are toxic to the body internally, but fine diffused. When in doubt, do the research. Obviously, if you can eat the plant, like cinnamon, the oil, if taken in a gel tab isn’t toxic. Drinking it directly will burn. Hot oil vs cool oil. Some like lemon, lime, orange, peppermint are fine in water. Learn each oil, as each one, like each child, has its own properties and should be used in the right way.
This post is the second in a weekly, multi-part series on Using Essential Oils. Last week we discussed Basic Essential Oils for Daily Living – how to get started using essential oils in your daily life. Here we will explore considerations to help you choose high quality essential oils. What should you look for? How can you guarantee an essential oil is pure? What does that even mean? What about cost? We invite you to learn how to choose an essential oil here and then join us weekly for additional articles on topics ranging from essential oil safety, using essential oils in herbalism, and carrier oils.
If it was me, I would look for a company that is happy to supply GCMS traces for all of their essential oils. Eden’s certificate of analysis is great, but as you say, it’s a shame it doesn’t give more detail on constituents. If a company can’t supply MSDS sheets then run a mile, because that’s essential! If they don’t have or will not share CGMS analyses, then they are not getting with the program. If they don’t have these, why don’t they have them? Why are they not not checking up on the quality of the oil they are buying? If they have them but won’t share them, why not? What do they have to hide? I would also look for organic certification. Aromatics International gives a full constituent breakdown for each of their oils on their website.
Topical applications: massage oils, and bath and skin care products are absorbed through the skin. Massaging the area where the oil is to be applied can boost circulation and increase absorption. Some argue that areas that are richer in sweat glands and hair follicles, such as the head or the palms of the hand, may absorb the oils more effectively.
Lavender 40/42 (Standardized) – This essential oil is the most common choice for applications in glycerin soap, candles, perfume, and cosmetics. The “40/42” refers to the balance of Linalool and Linalyl acetate esters, which is what gives it such a consistent floral scent but also means it is standardized.  For this reason some aromatherapists regard this oil as something that is not considered 'therapeutic grade" or "pure grade" since it is does not come directly from the plant in this form.  Instead this oil is standardized in a lab to ensure consistency in smell. It also has a balsamic woody undertone with a floral, herbaceous fresh scent.
There is a Cinnamon essential oil, however the flavoring kind you get at a grocery store is not an essential oil in that it isn’t therapeutic grade so it has no therapeutic benefits. Many of these are made with synthetic oils (though not all of them) that just taste like what you want and all of these kind of oils have lots of filler oil like the sunflower oil. This does make it ok that you are using so much though. 🙂 If it were real therapeutic grade essential oil that much of it would be such a strongly concentrated flavor that you’d cut back to a drop or two really quick. It also would be an unsafe health choice to take such a large dose of any therapeutic grade oil no matter the type, source, or purity. I do hope that it helps anyway, but I can vouch for the pure therapeutic grade cinnamon along with lemon EO helping control my blood sugar levels. I love essential oils. Aren’t they great?
All companies and marketing aside, how do YOU most effectively use essential oils and do you have a resource to recommend that gives good guidelines to the beginner (i.e. which oils can be used topically and internally, and recommended dilutions, etc.) I have heard of a big reference book called The Complete Book of Essential Oils to be good–are you familiar with this title?
I’m totally new to thr essential oil world. All I’d heard is Young Living is the only pure one and the only way to go. I was skeptical and I don’t know why. Have started reading and now I’m even more confised that when I started lol! Who do/can I trust. It’s hard to trust some of these big companies out there cause I feel they will tell you anything to sell you something. I wish we lived in a world of mom and pop places where u knew and trusted the person you bought from. Sigh….

Yes, many companies do GC/MS testing and infrared. The real test is, what do they compare the results to and what is that company’s standard for what a good oil is? If their standard is high, then they may reject oils which are below that standard. If their standard is not so high, then they will accept and sell more oils, even ones that have been rejected by a company with higher standards.
Yes, of the 3 brands I am most comfortable using for therapeutic purposes the first is doTerra. Its testing exceeds everything else I’ve come across protecting against not just fillers and chemical extraction, but also against oxidation for potency levels. When air hits the oils for a period of time they oxidize slowly and if that happens they may be less quick and effective than if they had not had that time to oxidize. No other company tests the same number of times for this level of potency. I also love that the testing is done by a third party rather than in house testing.
Words like “eco-friendly,” “pure,” “therapeutic grade,” and “certified,” are just some of the many words that you may find on a bottle of essential oil. “These phrases are devoid of scientific foundations or official regulations, yet they are frequently used to market products that cannot fulfill the producer’s promises,” says Nadine Artemis, botanical formulator and aromacologist and co-creator of Living Libations. “No organization, association, or commission monitors the purity or quality of essentials oils, and there is no universal essential oil grading systems in place. If you see these terms, beware.” Even reputable companies with quality essential oils create their own set of “standards” and “seals.” While that is not necessarily a red flag, the “seal” or “standard” stamp isn’t an industry-wide seal of approval from any governing commission.
Are they an eco-conscious company? One of the reasons I choose the essential oil (and herb) company that I use for my personal and business needs, is because of their sustainable practices. I am very passionate about being eco-friendly and when a business goes to such lengths to be a zero waste company as well as put time and money into other eco-conscious projects, I really have to take notice.
USE ESSENTIAL OILS TO HELP YOUR MOOD. Lavender, peppermint, grapefruit, chamomile, lemon, ylang-ylang all help produce happy, joyous moods. Clary sage helps with PMS (although there have been reports that overuse of clary sage can lead to intoxication). Rosemary increases focus and concentration. Don’t forget the mood benefits of essential oils. Here’s an information packed aromatherapy reference chart to refer to.

Marketing …ain’t it grand?! I totally agree with Amanda. But that doesn’t matter, because Young Living (and DoTerra) disciples won’t listen to science, or people with proper chemical/alternative medical training. On every forum, YL users, nay followers, stating with absolute certitude that only YL oils are pure: oddly people using Mountain Herb, Now…or other brands, don’t really care if others use ”their” brand or another, because they don’t have a stake in selling that brand unlike YL, no compensation plan. These people have a financial stake in YL. Every one of us uses our favourite brands, however we retain critical thinking therefore are open to suggestions/improvements unlike these aforementioned disciples of YL, that cannot see anything beyond ”their” brand. That in itself is a red flag.

This is really a good synopsis of important things to know, good job!! Just wanted to correct one point though. According to essential oil expert Robert Tisserand, being allergic to , say, ginger tea does NOT necessarily mean you’d be allergic to ginger essential. Plants and their corresponding EO’s do not necessarily have the same properties or actions. A patch test can be done if one is concerned about the possibility of being allergic to an essential oil.
Allergens are almost always composed of proteins or polypeptides, which are relatively large molecules. There are no proteins or polypeptides in essential oils. In fact, nitrogen containing compounds are virtually non-existent in essential oils except in occasional trace amounts. Allergens are composed of large molecules. There are no large molecules in volatile or aromatic oils, otherwise they would be neither volatile or aromatic.
Oh, and there’s no such thing as “Therapeutic grade” essential oils.  All that means is oils that haven’t been adulterated by adding carrier oils, etc. to them.  It’s a marketing ploy to make the oils seem purer than they are.  Really, “pure” essential oils are the bottom level of purity/safety.  Wilfcrafted and organic are the safest and most beneficial.
I’m still a beginner but I know that for many essential oils, you need what is called a carrier oil. These carrier oils mixed with the essential oil are what make it safe for skin. I suggest looking into getting the book ( aromatherapy for beginners) if you are serious about it. I’m still reading it but it has a tone of info, meanings, recipes and helpful terms of understanding. Also, it has a handy section in the back about resources online and in books to learn more and to find your essential oils. Good luck. 😀

Thank you all for your input and time. I too have been confused, frustrated, skeptical, and at times alarmed. What YL consultants don’t realize when they spout comments about micro and chemical biology, are the consequences that come with doing or not doing what they recommend. This is the grey area that is dangerous and the absolute reason and need for the FDA in the pharmaceutical industry. I am in the marketing industry, so I full well understand the MLM model or any other business model. I don’t blame them, for there is no difference between that and what Homeland does vs. Piggly Wiggly or Macy’s vs. JC Penney, or Walmart vs. Kmart… Thanks for helping me understand the real language and science involved.
Thank you for all the great info. Help me understand more about “ingestible” EOs versus “noningestibles”. If “noningestibles” are okay for use in soaps and other skin products, and the skin absorbs what’s put on it into the blood stream, then 1) why are “noningestible” EOs okay in skin care products, and 2) why can’t we ingest “noningestible” EOs under the tongue or diluted in a glass of water, for example?

Hannah, all the multi-level-marketing companies say that theirs are the only true and pure essential oils. But, they all buy from the same distillers and wholesale suppliers as every other aromatherapy business. (And notice how they will spin stories that make it sound as if they buy all their oils from unique sources…) Somehow they have to justify their much higher prices, which are needed to support the MLM business model. Their products are similarly priced. Great quality, but you can get the same great quality from many other sources, with less hype, and less mark-up.
1. Pułk Strzelców Konnych 1PSK 1916 1920 1930 1933 1934 1935 1938 1939 1944 AK album bombardowanie cmentarz Garwolin Górzno Historia Huta Czechy I Wojna Światowa Kapica kościół książka Maciejowice Matysiak Miętne Narcyz Witczak-Witaczyński obchody Parysów pilawa pomoc powiat garwoliński pożar Rowy Rębków szkoła trąbki ul. Kościuszki Wilga wojna polsko-bolszewicka Wspomnienia zdjęcia Łaskarzew Żelechów Żydzi
Many EO users don’t know this because Ameo has only been around for a little over a year, but clinical-grade is the highest EO grade available in the U.S. They are extensively tested to make sure the quality is as high as those oils used in clinical testing or even higher potency. I’ve used most other brands, and know what I know now I would absolutely never use another brand internally unless they were certified organic because of the risk of getting synthetic ingredients and toxins. However, using just ‘organic’ oils does NOT ensure that you have the highest potency/efficacy which you can be sure of when you use Ameo. If you watch the videos on the website you’ll understand more about it. There are videos of the oils penetrating human cells posted for every single batch of oils from Ameo.
I see a lot of comments on here that advise unsafe practices on ingesting essential oils and using them undiluted. Essential oils should never be ingested unless under the care of a doctor or naturopath. In France, only a doctor can prescribe injestion and in Britain they don’t advise it at all. There are many cases of individuals being harmed by this practice. Essential oils are highly concentrated and do not need to be ingested in order to be effective. Also, essential oils should not be used on children, or anyone else, undiluted. Peppermint oil, in particular, has been shown to slow breathing in infants and shouldn’t be used on or diffused around them. I suggest that anyone using essential oils educate themselves on their effectiveness and dangers. There are many great resources, including Dr. Tisserand’s book “Essential Oil Safety”. Education should go beyond that of what a particular company tells you or trains you to do.

Inhalation: With oils that are safe to use on the skin (know before you try), you can also take a single drop into one of your hands and rub your hands together to warm them up and spread the oil. Then cup your hands around your nose and take in a deep breath. Doing this, you can achieve the same mood and emotional benefits as with diffusion. A little goes a long way.
I bought frontier brand cinnamon flavoring at a health food store. Is this cinnamon considered an essential oil? It says to use a few drops in baking cookies, cakes and other recipes, or 2 Tbsp. in a quart in a quart of simmering water with cloves and cinnamon sticks for relaxation. I have been using 1/4tsp. to 1/2tsp and sometimes more several times a day on cereals, tea and other foods thinking it might help control my blood sugar which was edging up in the pre-diabetes range. Is it safe to be consuming this much (organic sunflower oil and cinnamon oil are the 2 ingredients listed on bottle) in this manner?
Hi! I suffer from connective tissue disease (similar to lupus or RA in pain), and I use lemongrass DILUTED in coconut oil. It is amazing how well this works for pain. Peppermint is awesome for headaches as well as nausea, and marjoram is another pain med. Some oils don’t do much for me except smell really good, but those three have been invaluable. I get mine from doTerra, but I’m going to check out the other site mentioned by Crunchy Betty. Thanks!
Essential Oils are the real deal. They have therapeutic actions, they have been tested and studies have been done on them. Check out pubmed, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. In the search engine, type in an essential oil and you will see that studies have been done. I am a certified aromatherapist. I have gone to college to get my training in aromatherapy and herbal studies. This is a viable option for medical treatment. Just like any other medical field, the person needs to be certified before they can start suggesting the oils. They need to know the complications and contraindications of the oils. Essential oils are 70 TIMES MORE potent than the plant material itself. What scares me as an aromatherapist is that people or companies like those mentioned above are not certified to suggest the use of these oils. They do also push more expensive such as immortelle, sandalwood, & frankincense. They are all wonderful oils, but you can use more cost effective oils for with similar results. There is sustainability issues with sandalwood & frankincense right now & into the foreseeable future. They are not the most ethical oils to buy, until they can propagate the trees back from near extinction. It takes at least 30 to 50 years for the sandalwood “heart” oil to be harvested from the tree. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t know about essential oils or herbs. Aromatherapy has been around since 5,000 BC. It has a long documented history, along with herbal medicine. Just keep that in mind.
Second, don't assume you can use an essential oil for flavoring anything you're going to eat unless it's either food grade (usually labeled and more diluted to prevent injury), has been inspected by the FDA (these will have a nutrition label somewhere), or you know the oils are 100% pure with no additives and you know how to appropriately dilute them to make them edible. If there is no FDA label, there is a good chance that the oil is not 100% what it says it is - it most likely has some additives that are probably best not to consume. For these oils in particular, I personally would not consume them, despite the fact that the labels say they are 100% "insert oil here". The fact that the label specifically says "for external use only" helps that decision :P

I’m not so sure that the FDA is always spot on with their statements–sometimes they tend to under–or overreact in they synopsis of what is healthy and what isn’t. However, if methyl salicylate is indeed toxic and they are moderating how much goes into packaging stickers, then should Wintergreen oil be consumed at all (or does the methyl salicylate become more neutralized when consumed with all the constituents of the oil)?


I researched EO’s a Few years ago but wound up not getting into it. I’m back. I love to research and learn. I loved this article. But, I also learned that I would never buy from Young Living or DeTerra…… Pure to me means mind, body and soul.. The whole debate is a cacophony….. Anyway, thank you for ALL the info, good and bad = balanced…… PS I’m probably going to start with the NOW oils and/or check put While Foods mainly bc I’m in the dabbling stage
Tea tree oil! I did not even think of this as an essential oil product. It has been a staple of my bathroom cabinet for years as a shampoo additive. One or two drops in the bottle of shampoo and those pesky head lice (that I frequently encounter in elementary school settings) are goners! I have waist length hair, and after contracting lice a couple of times, I asked my primary physician what I could do besides keep my hair up (a possibility) or cutting it short (not happening).
I learned a lot scanning the Blog about EO’s. Was considering gathering 3-4 I use a lot and sharing with the family as Xmas gifts. The Blog site really helped – especially Crubchy Betty’s list of 21 essential bits of info.I have only bought at GNC (ugh) but nice to have more options as fas as quality and price. I use peppermint EO just a drop iunder my nose at night to open up my sinuses and it works great! The peppermint is also helpful on temporals and behind the ears for sea sickness! And when I can’t sleep, the lavendar works wonders. Ginger is also a powerful anti-nausea EO for me.
P.S. To respond to the one poster who said attributes are personality traits, such as courage, etc.. and that you can’t get those from the oils. You are right! It is my belief that the energy of the oils helps clear the blockages in the energy of the person to have more of those attributes. That may seem unclear or woo-woo, but that is the way I feel about it. 🙂
In the world of essential oils there is an enormous amount of controversy and competition, with some companies accusing other companies of being less pure, while others claim trademarks and exclusivity on their products. All of this noise creates plenty of confusion for the average consumer to sift through, especially since there is no official regulation or oversight on the essential oil industry, federal or otherwise.
” Essential oils are wholly natural and cannot be patented; which means that you’ll never see an essential oil in a pharmaceutical drug. As such, you can expect that the vast majority of mainstream healthcare practitioners will never recommend essential oils as therapeutic alternatives to drugs. More importantly, because essential oils cannot be patented, drug companies will not waste money studying them. This limits our scientific knowledge of essential oils GREATLY, and the majority of what we know about them are things that have been passed down through thousands of years of personal use and experimentation.” So how can any claim to be “therapeutic”….? WE all know they work but….
After using it for over a week I'm very impressed. I had also ordered other Frankincense oils from other vendors and this one is or has the highest antiseptic quality! I know this because I've used a few different brands on some skin abrasions and this one dropped me to my knees in pain. It really needs to be diluted, so far warning it's that powerful! It worked within days of using it on some reddish patch of skin on my face and worked well! I highly recommend this brand!

One thing I wonder though (couldn’t find it on the websites you listed either) – My grandmother loves the smell of tomato leaves and I ran across a hand cream that was tomato leaf scented once when I was overseas but it was too much liquid to bring home. Is there somewhere I can find an essential oil or make one or something like it to make a nice handcream for her?

Because standards for quality control of essential oils do not currently exist in the United States, it is important to find reputable sources that sell good quality essential oils if you are planning to use them for health-related purposes. Whether you buy essential oils in a store, from an individual, or from the internet, be sure to read any information provided on the label or website, or ask questions about quality.

Yes, of the 3 brands I am most comfortable using for therapeutic purposes the first is doTerra. Its testing exceeds everything else I’ve come across protecting against not just fillers and chemical extraction, but also against oxidation for potency levels. When air hits the oils for a period of time they oxidize slowly and if that happens they may be less quick and effective than if they had not had that time to oxidize. No other company tests the same number of times for this level of potency. I also love that the testing is done by a third party rather than in house testing.
PLEASE READ THESE ONLINE STORE TERMS AND CONDITIONS VERY CAREFULLY. THIS IS A LEGAL AGREEMENT (“AGREEMENT”) BETWEEN YOU AND ANCIENT BRANDS, LLC D/B/A ANCIENT NUTRITION (“COMPANY”). BY CLICKING ON THE “I ACCEPT” BUTTON AND COMPLETING YOUR ORDER OF ANCIENT NUTRITION, DR. AXE OR ANY OTHER PRODUCT OFFERED FOR SALE ON THE BELOW WEB SITE(S) (COLLECTIVELY, THE “PRODUCTS”), YOU ARE AGREEING TO BE BOUND BY, AND ARE BECOMING A PARTY TO, THIS AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT, DO NOT CLICK ON THE “I ACCEPT” BUTTON AND ABANDON YOUR PURCHASE OF PRODUCTS.
×