A few drops of lavender essential oil has many properties for body and mind. Lavender essential oil is gentle enough to be applied directly on the skin and is commonly used by massage therapists and naturopaths. Also, lavender essential oil provides beneficial properties for dry and sensitive skin, has soothing properties that help reduce stress and has calming effects that help induce sleep.
The recommended usage of many essential oils is hotly contested throughout the aromatherapy profession. The majority of oils you find in the supermarket are absolutely safe (though you should research them before using them); however, once you start digging into the world of essential oils, you’ll find that professionals – even within the same organization – debate extensively over the use of certain oils. If you’re ever unsure about an oil or its use, do the research you can, and if you still cannot make up your mind as to its safety – avoid it. But, by all means, do NOT be afraid of essential oils. Just use them with care and respect, and all will be fine.
In my article I explain why “such terms as pharmaceutical grade, therapeutic grade or food grade have no meaning in relation to the quality of essential oils for aromatherapy.” But, at the end of the article, you inserted a box, with: Read about therapeutic grade essential oils in “Powerful Tools in A Small Bottle”, by Dawn-Mari Yurkovic at www.massagemag.com/powerfultools. OK, I can take a hint, even if it’s thrust in my face.
Myrrh has been used in rituals, anointing blends and perfumery since ancient times, and was felt to enhance spirituality during sacred rites. The oil has a rich and warm, woody yet bittersweet scent which is pleasant to use during meditation. We offer a premium quality Myrrh, and a more cost-efficient selection from India that is softer and sweeter, to cover your product needs.
Now Foods – great price, OK essential oils for cleaning house and scenting your room. You can find these at your local Whole Foods or Central Market or for the best price, on Amazon. They even have a few organic ones as well. I only use this brand for my cleaning needs because I don't like using my precious Mountain Rose Herbs essential oils on something like cleaning. You also have to pay close attention to their labels as they do sell oils that are already diluted with a carrier oil and their Jasmine oil is cut with fragrance oil to save them money, but they DO label it. (Jasmine is very expensive on its own. Don't buy their Jasmine oil because fragrance oils are what you are trying to avoid.) You can read more about NOW Foods on their FAQ page.
In response to my request for testing results, the company I reached out to explained that they do testing each month, but if I wanted to review the tests I would need to sign a non-disclosure agreement owing to the proprietary information in the results. I am also guessing that they were not willing to share the results of their testing for other privacy reasons given how competitive this market has become. To receive this information, I would also be required to grant them access to a private Facebook group I manage where the discussion had first sparked my questioning. (I can only assume one of the members of this group approached the company directly asking the questions that were being raised.)

As a busy mom of 5, I am all about being a good consumer. I want people to be able to get excellent oils, good prices, and to see how wonderful they can be for health and well being. Trust how you feel about the oils- they have an energy and a vibration like all LIVING things. If they feel dead, don’t buy them. If they are waaay overpriced, don’t buy them. Thanks again for such a great unbiased article, that shed the light on some issues those of us outside of mlm companies have been discouraged by.
Thank you so much for the objective, thorough information! I have some questions about “organic certification”. My understanding, with plants or foods that are produced organically, is that 100% organic is impossible because of cross contamination. So in the case of EO’s is organic less important because any chemical (ie pesticides, herbicides) that is not part of the oil is removed in the distillation process, or it is considered adulterated? For example, a company might state their oils are “certifiably organic” but they could still be contaminated because this certification allows a small percentage of contaminants. Any clarification would be greatly appreciated!
Disclaimer: The information provided is general and should not be taken as medical advice. Neither Bulk Apothecary or associated business entities guarantee the accuracy of the information. Please consult your doctor, especially if being used during pregnancy, before using this product. You are also encouraged to test the product to ensure that it meets your needs, before using for mass production. 
In our scent tests the Stillpoint’s oils started off smelling mild and fresh, but then after a minute or two they magically blossomed and became very rich, deep, vibrant, stronger and more clear; almost like a fine wine opens up after being uncorked for some time. And for those who may be sensitive to subtle energies, these oils possessed a very clean and high vibration, which is an enormous benefit when using the oils for spiritual practice. No other oils we tested performed this way.

Thank You SO MUCH for this article. I recently saw something on tv !@ essential oils- I have been using essential oils for a couple of years – in a diffuser, in baths, roll-ons, etc.. I have been on the computer ‘googling’ for hours-this is the most informative & helpful information I have found-THANK YOU – YOU LISTED EVERYTHING I WAS LOOKING FOR!! (that being said, I am now throwing out the majority of my various botles of essential oils (diff. brands) because they contain synthetics WHICH IS ABSOLUTELY THE LAST THING I WANT OR NEED (I have CFIDS/FM) Thank You Again,
Most common essential oils such as lavender, peppermint, tea tree oil, patchouli, and eucalyptus are distilled. Raw plant material, consisting of the flowers, leaves, wood, bark, roots, seeds, or peel, is put into an alembic (distillation apparatus) over water. As the water is heated, the steam passes through the plant material, vaporizing the volatile compounds. The vapors flow through a coil, where they condense back to liquid, which is then collected in the receiving vessel.
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