Aromatic use: Our sense of smell is a powerful one! Essential oils are quickly absorbed by smell receptors, and can influence our physiological, mental and emotional states. Some essential oils have uplifting effects, while others have energizing or calming effects. Diffusion is one of the easiest ways to use essential oils aromatically; however, as mentioned earlier, you don’t have to have a diffuser to enjoy the aroma of essential oils.
Aromatic use: Our sense of smell is a powerful one! Essential oils are quickly absorbed by smell receptors, and can influence our physiological, mental and emotional states. Some essential oils have uplifting effects, while others have energizing or calming effects. Diffusion is one of the easiest ways to use essential oils aromatically; however, as mentioned earlier, you don’t have to have a diffuser to enjoy the aroma of essential oils.
I was wondering. I have a friend that has neuropathy. I do too. I use wintergreen diluted with fractionated coconut oil or a blend called deep blue, and sometimes peppermint oil for this. The friend asked the question, Can you mix all oils safely? As she has found on pinterest a recipe for it where you mix 8 different oils. I am not sure of the oils she has listed, but is this safe?
You said that YL and other MLM companies buy some of their oils from other suppliers. YL’s promotional DVDs and literature make viewers believe that everything in their bottles is in their control from “seed to seal.” However, upon closer inspection of one of their manuals, I do see references to their purchases from other distillers (upon whom they put high standards). YL stresses the importance of such things as the precise timing of harvesting plants (even to the time of day), and the timing in distilling plants (and heat/pressure used). They deem all these things as absolutely vital to making a high quality, “therepeutic” essential oil.
As the vaporized microscopic particles come into contact with the soft and moist tissue inside your nose and sinuses their beneficial properties enter directly into your bloodstream and get dispersed throughout your body. At the same time they travel up the olfactory nerve (the one that operates your sense of smell) to the limbic region of your brain where you process feelings and emotions. This is also an important area of the brain involved in memory. Smell and memory are processed through the same part of the brain; that’s why when you smell cookies baking in the oven you may have flashbacks of childhood.

If you're feeling confused, stick with the basics. "Lavender oil is a great EO for beginners. You can inhale it before sleeping, pour a few drops into a diffuser, or rub it onto your pressure points (neck, wrists, and other places where your pulse is most prominent). Plenty of studies have been done on lavender oil to demonstrate its efficacy," Trattner says.


There are so many other factors, OMG: a vast change of life and responsibility, the huge challenges of parenthood, the (low) value our society gives parents and mothers, sexism, etc etc. I found it important to explore and heal these things are they came up when I was a young mother, but boy, there was something off chemically for me that no amount of healing addressed.
Estrogenic and antiandrogenic activity have been reported by in vitro study of tea tree oil and lavender essential oils. Two published sets of case reports suggest the lavender oil may be implicated in some cases of gynecomastia, an abnormal breast tissue growth in prepubescent boys.[44][45] The European Commission's Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety dismissed the claims against tea tree oil as implausible, but did not comment on lavender oil.[46] In 2018, a BBC report on a study stated that tea tree and lavender oils contain eight substances that when tested in tissue culture experiments, increasing the level of estrogen and decreasing the level of testosterone. Some of the substances are found in "at least 65 other essential oils". The study did not include animal or human testing.[47]
I do have issues with YL because they are not actually training their distributors in Aromatherapy, just their version. Having had a cousin die from ingesting Wintergreen when she was a toddler. Her mother had been responsible and placed the bottle in a very high cupboard but the older daughter helped her little sister climb up to get it. She was dead by the time her mum found her. By encouraging people to eat essential oils without the appropriate training to understand what oils are actually safe is irresponsible. Many essential oils which we consider to be GRAS are toxic if over-used as well as taken internally. For instance Eucalyptus, my understanding is that it wouldn’t take much when taken internally to kill you.
Words like “eco-friendly,” “pure,” “therapeutic grade,” and “certified,” are just some of the many words that you may find on a bottle of essential oil. “These phrases are devoid of scientific foundations or official regulations, yet they are frequently used to market products that cannot fulfill the producer’s promises,” says Nadine Artemis, botanical formulator and aromacologist and co-creator of Living Libations. “No organization, association, or commission monitors the purity or quality of essentials oils, and there is no universal essential oil grading systems in place. If you see these terms, beware.” Even reputable companies with quality essential oils create their own set of “standards” and “seals.” While that is not necessarily a red flag, the “seal” or “standard” stamp isn’t an industry-wide seal of approval from any governing commission.
So, between their “extra” or more extensive methods of testing, their control over growth and harvest, the use of their own labs and equipment (which Gary Young states are the only instruments in the world that are matched and calibrated to the instruments used at the National Center for Scientific Research in France), YL openly declares that their oils are “therapeutic” grade and no other oils but their own are fully safe to be used neat or internally.

As you can see, the choice for the right essential oil brand can be very convoluted. There are so many brands on the market, it can be hard to sift through the duds to find the right ones. The key is taking a step back and listening to what the companies are saying. You should also make sure to read the labels, your essential oil label should say 100% pure and not “blend” or “with jojoba/almond” as that means they are already diluted and not just pure essential oil. According to The East-West School For Herbal and Aromatic Studies, some of the qualities that you want to look for in an essential oil supplier are:
Rocky Mountain Oils (RMO) is a company based out of Orem, Utah, operating since 2004 and one of the leading essential oil brands available today. Not only can you buy essential oils at RMO, you’ll also find a comprehensive line-up of skin care, cleaning, wellness, body care, natural supplements, or aromatherapy blending supplies on their online shop.
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Plant Therapy’s labels are a bit scarce in their information. They display the proper Latin names and the USDA Organic logo, but that’s it. Instead of including the country of origin and other important notes — which can be found on the website — they have a long description of what the oils could be used for and how to use it, followed by an FDA disclaimer so they won’t get in trouble.
The notion of using essential oils as a replacement for standard medical therapy is not new. Today’s essential oils are yesterday’s herbal remedies. They’re your grandmother’s swamp root, your great-grandmother’s liver pills and your great-great-grandmother’s snake oil (hey, at least we made it back to oil). And as in those days, somebody’s getting rich selling their wares. Why? Because there will always be folks who claim they work and others who buy into the claim looking for a quick fix. My question for believers in the crowd: how do you know the remedy really did the job? Runny noses get better. Coughs and bellyaches go away. Rashes clear up, skin heals and behavior fluctuates.
Now, before we dig in, it’s important to remember that just because something is regulated, approved, standardized, or widely available doesn’t mean it is inert, especially when misused. This means for the safe use of any substance, natural or synthetic, following the instructions for intended and proper use, not over-dosing, using common sense, and considering the individual’s unique biochemistry and health history are all paramount.
To minimize the risks of topical essential oil application, it’s best to dilute essential oils with a carrier oil, or a neutral oil that can contain the essential oil. "Most allergic reactions are caused by the application of pure oils, or high-concentration products," Lortscher says. "But if you tolerate them or dilute them, they can help with dry, flaky skin, provide some antioxidant benefits, and also help relax your body."

AFNOR standards were established by The Association for French Normalization Organization Regulation for the French essential oil industry. The program was so successful that the International Standards Organization (ISO) adopted the AFNOR standards for essential oils and provides a list of these ISO standards and guidance for essential oils on their web site. Surprisingly enough, no USA Company or organization has adopted these standards to date and all continue to make silly claims to try to prove quality without any regulatory body supporting their claims.
I used lavender essential oil with water as a body spray- it turns out THAT was what my skin reacted to– I thought I had hives on my chest, but it didn’t go away. Fortunately, since I had replaced my toiletry items with natural/homemade, it was easy to determine the lavender as the cause by process of elimination. That has to be the biggest reason to go natural– especially if your skin is sensitive…it allows you to personalize and customize while ensuring that you know every particle of what you are using 🙂 Thanks for everything!

I submitted an article, which you published as a Guest Editorial on page 22 of your March 2010 issue, entitled Essential Oils: Premium Quality Yields Premium Results. On page 10, your Contents Page, this was listed as: Guest Editorial: Read about therapeutic grade essential oils in “Powerful Tools in A Small Bottle”, by Dawn-Mari Yurkovic, at www.massagemag.com/powerfultools. Don’t you agree this is a little weird? One person writes a two-page article, and a completely different person/article is listed on the Contents page of the magazine?


Much of my frustration comes from mlm companies proclaiming that THEIR oils are the best and that therapeutic grade means everything. Because there are not alot of distilleries around the world, many of us are getting our oils from the exact same places. Yet MLM’s tend to jack their prices up to over double in some cases, and use their claims as being the best to fortify the price increase. I do feel for consumers though. It is hard to know who to trust. I know of quite a few wonderful companies out there, besides mine that have wonderful, well priced oils. Yes, as you said, you will also pay for quality, but you need to trust who that supplier is. MLM’s will always have higher prices because of their structure. While that bothers me, it is their exclusivity that bothers me more, especially when I know we are sourcing from the same places.
An essential oil is a concentrated, volatile, aromatic liquid that is obtained from the fruits, seeds, flowers, bark, stems, roots, leaves or other parts of a plant. There are estimated to be 10,000 aromatic plants (ie that contain essential oils) on Earth, and about 500 of these are processed commercially for essential oil extraction. These oils have been used for centuries for both their healing and aromatic benefits. Plant Therapy offers over 100 of these essential oils.
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