I have bought dozens of essential oils from Piping Rock. Their prices are simply the best, especially considering the free shipping and “Crazy Deals” they offer and change almost daily. You can get 15 ml of 100% neroli oil for about $15, and it’s lovely! They also have a 15 ml bottle of 100% West Indian sandalwood for $39.95, and it smells GREAT. A 15 ml bottle of 100% pure cistus oil is about $13 or $14. It can’t be beat! Many of the normally cheaper oils (peppermint, orange, cedarwood, tangerine, tea tree, pine etc.) are wonderfully priced too -almost a steal. Their rose, jasmine and tuberose blends did not disappoint scent-wise (they weren’t too weak at all). Their oils come in glass bottles with stoppers and pretty labels. I was scared at first because of how cheap their prices are, but I’m glad I took the chance. On top of the great products, they ship SUPER FAST, package well, and my orders are always complete and correct. So happy with this company. Lastly, by signing up with the http://www.mrrebates.com website (it’s free), and accessing piping rock from there, you will get a %10 discount on your purchase, which you eventually receive as a refund in cash that you can have added to your PayPal account. I’ve earned over $50 in refunds! I’ve seen this % go up and down by a little from time to time, but the average is 10% (which it is as of today, 5/8/14). Maybe wait for a “free shipping day” and try some of the cheaper oils to test the waters first. Even when you have to pay for shipping (for orders under $40), the shipping is a flat $3.95 rate!
Think about this for a moment – the aromatherapy industry is not the only user of essential oils. In fact, aromatherapy accounts for a very small percentage. The majority of essential oils produced end up in food flavouring, pharmaceutical, perfumery and personal care and these essential oils are usually modified to meet the standards required for each of these industries.
LEGAL: Medicinal ESSENTIALS products are manufactured using the highest grade of materials that are grown organically, contain no pesticides, no residual solvents, no heavy metals and no mildew or mold. All our Phytocannabinoid rich products we package or distribute are derived from 100% federally legal Industrial Hemp that is registered with the Department of Agriculture. This Industrial Hemp conforms fully to the 2014 US Farm Bill section 7606 which federally legalized the cultivation of Industrial Hemp under certain federal mandated conditions. All Industrial Hemp products we produce, manufacture, market and distribute are fully compliant with all 50 states.
Thank you all for your input and time. I too have been confused, frustrated, skeptical, and at times alarmed. What YL consultants don’t realize when they spout comments about micro and chemical biology, are the consequences that come with doing or not doing what they recommend. This is the grey area that is dangerous and the absolute reason and need for the FDA in the pharmaceutical industry. I am in the marketing industry, so I full well understand the MLM model or any other business model. I don’t blame them, for there is no difference between that and what Homeland does vs. Piggly Wiggly or Macy’s vs. JC Penney, or Walmart vs. Kmart… Thanks for helping me understand the real language and science involved.
As far back as A.D. 1000, healers used mechanical presses or steam to extract essential oils from fragrant plants. Today, practitioners can rub oil-infused lotions on the skin, where the compounds are absorbed into the bloodstream. Or they can diffuse them into the air where, once inhaled, they bind to smell receptors and stimulate the central nervous system, says Joie Power, PhD, a neuropsychologist and aromatherapist who has taught nurses how to use the oils for decades.
Only pesticide residues that are hydrophilic, thermostable, and volatile can be carried over into an essential oil during distillation. Few pesticides possess these characteristics, so pesticide levels found in distilled oils are typically insignificant. In one large database, out of 73,541 analytical results on distilled essential oils, only 0.55% had positive results for pesticide detection.
This post is a definite BOOKMARK for me…I love all the info. My favorite essential oil to put in my burner is sweet orange – it just makes me so HAPPY! I read your response above about YLEO. I received a package of them as a gift a few years ago from a friend. I love them and have them in my studio all the time, but honestly I would never pay those prices. MLM completely scares me off of them too…just sharing my agreement with you 🙂
All companies and marketing aside, how do YOU most effectively use essential oils and do you have a resource to recommend that gives good guidelines to the beginner (i.e. which oils can be used topically and internally, and recommended dilutions, etc.) I have heard of a big reference book called The Complete Book of Essential Oils to be good–are you familiar with this title?
In many industries (healthcare, agriculture, etc., as you are probably very familiar), there are Independent Certification Bodies, Accreditation Services, that are generally not-for-profit and independent—watchdogs who make sure that what companies say is happening is actually happening.  With every certification there are specific parameters that the product must meet: So for instance, in the US, the USDA sets the standards for organic agriculture, and any certifying bodies must be approved by the USDA to be credible. This system creates multiple levels of independent evaluation—and a company can't just claim that its products are organic, at least on packaging, unless it's been certified so by this system of certification. 

Hi. I have been using DoTERRA’s products for approx. 6 months in many ways, topically, diffuser, cleaning, cooking, etc. I recently had surgery and got a bad cold while in the hospital. I started using doTERRA’s OnGuard throat drops and continually got worse (I also suffer from asthma so was using my inhalers as well.). Do you think there is any way the drops killed too much of the good bacteria in my mouth and throat? Just wondering your thoughts on this. Looking forward to your feedback.
An essential oil does not have to be adulterated to be inferior. Plant quality, climate, location, growing conditions, harvest, and production technique have a lot to do with quality. Of course, environmental conditions directly affect the percentages of each component of the essential oil. Botanical variety and Chemotype identification also play a part in quality determination. Like organic, ‘wild crafted’ is another overused term. Many imported essential oils come from non-plantation sources.
After dong much research and reading many reviews. Native American nutritional’s is the choice of most that use essential oils commercially. Do terra is 2nd and young living is right up there. Most professional’s don’t even want to touch young living and other pyramid marketing companies. A friend sells young living so I did get a bottle of valor from her. I have a variety of brands that i found through research just to try them. From what I’ve read, young living and doterra are so expensive because of how they are marketed. Not because they are superior.
Essential oils have become a very important natural alternative for consumers throughout the world, but many consumers still need to be educated about the benefits that they can provide. ZEVA Essential Oils is dedicated to providing support for retailers to learn more about our product line as well as the many benefits that essential oils can offer. ZEVA’s founder, Dr. Tracy Gibbs, is a world-renowned expert in pharmacognosy, and offers his experience and expertise through lectures, books, and other resources, to those who want to sell the products.
In my article I explain why “such terms as pharmaceutical grade, therapeutic grade or food grade have no meaning in relation to the quality of essential oils for aromatherapy.” But, at the end of the article, you inserted a box, with: Read about therapeutic grade essential oils in “Powerful Tools in A Small Bottle”, by Dawn-Mari Yurkovic at www.massagemag.com/powerfultools. OK, I can take a hint, even if it’s thrust in my face.
CBD is short for cannabidiol which is a compound found in the marijuana plant. The other compound that most people are more familiar with is THC, which is what classifies marijuana as a psychoactive drug. CBD DOES NOT contain the side effects of THC. For years, the effect of CBD oil for inflammation, fibromyalgia, and depression has been studied by medical experts. Though CBD ointment for pain has been used for centuries, studies have shown that the chemical compound found in cannabidiol can benefit those suffering from many different ailments.
Bergamot Essential Oil has a fresh and delightful citrus aroma with strong citrus notes and a hint of the exotic, and has been made popular by Earl Grey Tea. This refreshing essential oil is suited for aromatherapy and induces a more relaxed and happy feeling, while reducing oiliness of the skin. Widely used in the perfume industry, it is also used in cleansers and toners.
A friend of ours recently became associated with doTerra and invited my wife and I to a “party” where doTerra sales reps talked about the benefits of EO’s and offered to sell various package deals or individual bottles of doTerra EO’s. They talked about the independent testing that doTerra has done by outside labs that they call CPTG (Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade). I came home and have been researching doTerra and Young Living on the internet (and believe me, I am skeptical of what I read on the internet), but I am very skeptical when companies make unsubstantiated claims about their products. I read doTerra’s testing protocol, but they say nothing about using an independent laboratory to perform the tests. Apparently there are no industry standards that apply to EO. doTerra is a MLM (multilevel marketing) company, kind of what I think of as a pyramid scheme, so their products are more expensive because there are many “middle men”. I don’t have a dog in the fight, other than my dollars, so I have spent several hours trying to educated myself about equally good products for less money. I settled on a company called Organic Infusions, and ordered a few of their oils, and when they arrive, I will compare with our friend’s doTerra oils and see if we can tell any difference. As for Young Living, Gary Young seems to be of very questionable character when you read about various schemes and scams he has allegedly been involved in. You can read about him for yourself by googling Gary Young quackery. I am not recommending the company that I ordered from, as I have not tried their products yet. There is a lot of information out there, Let the buyer beware!
Also, if you drink it, you should only use a glass or stainless steel container. Glass is highly preferred over the two and the easiest for cleaning out of the previous EO. The smell/taste of an EO tends to “linger” a bit. This is usually a good thing I would think in say aromatherapy but in this case not so much…unless of course you prefer to use the same EO each time.

I would like to start using EO in my home now that I am a mom and have become a lot more aware of the harsh chemicals in all of my cleaning supplies, beauty products and air fresheners. I am currently EBF and know that there are certain EO that I should avoid. Does this mean I shouldn’t be exposed to them at all or that I should not use them topically?
Thank you Holly! I’m happy to see someone stand up and clarify the fact that doTerra does stand behind their oils. To state such a statement of an oil to 100% certified pure therapeutic grade does mean something….especially is you consider using them internally or for cooking. If you are considering using essential oils instead of over the counter drugs, which contain many chemical ingredients (by the way, they use the same plants to create their drugs only they change them chemically and add other things), why not go all the way and eliminate ALL toxic and chemical additions to your body?? My suggestion, do your homework and research! Don’t take someone’s word for it in a comment. Buy a few bottles of the same oil (I hope you’ll consider doTerra) and compare how you feel.
Not all essential oils are created equally, nor does more expensive necessarily mean “better.” There are certain brands I will use in a less therapeutic fashion (like for cleaning), because they’re far less expensive than their counterparts. When you see a wide fluctuation in price between, say, lavender essential oils, you can bet that the far less expensive one is likely lower in quality.
Lavender 40/42 (Standardized) – This essential oil is the most common choice for applications in glycerin soap, candles, perfume, and cosmetics. The “40/42” refers to the balance of Linalool and Linalyl acetate esters, which is what gives it such a consistent floral scent but also means it is standardized.  For this reason some aromatherapists regard this oil as something that is not considered 'therapeutic grade" or "pure grade" since it is does not come directly from the plant in this form.  Instead this oil is standardized in a lab to ensure consistency in smell. It also has a balsamic woody undertone with a floral, herbaceous fresh scent.
The third and most shocking thing that I learned (this was most shocking because I really felt like I had been lied to when I found this) is that the words that these companies use such as “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade”, are TRADEMARKED PHRASES by their corresponding essential oil company. This means that the reason each of these companies claims that “no other company can say….”, it's because their company has trademarked the words…from the doTERRA website:”CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade is a registered trademark of dōTERRA Holdings, LLC representing internal standards of quality assessment and material control. The CPTG protocol is not administered by government or industry regulatory agencies and does not imply regulatory approval of dōTERRA products.”
Yes we all agree that there is no independent standard forTherapeutic Grade that is universally recognized. And while you may not like the promotion ofTherapeutic Grade by various companies, it’s not really correct to say that “thereis no such thing as Therapeutic Grade.” Ithink a better response to those promoting such an idea would be to say”while many companies promote their own therapeutic grade standard, oneshould be aware that there is no universally accepted independent body thatcertifies essential oils as therapeutic grade.” That is a fairstatement that is factually correct that nobody can disagree with and will notcause dialog to shut down between those in the direct marketing companies andthose on the more traditional side of aromatherapy.

According to Avery, while specific dilutions can vary based on personal needs and individual essential oils, the general rule of thumb is to aim for a one to five percent dilution. "A one percent blend is six drops of essential oil per ounce of carrier, while a five percent blend would be 30 drops per ounce of carrier," she says. For specifics, check out Aura Cacia's handy dilution guide.
Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young.
Myrrh has been used in rituals, anointing blends and perfumery since ancient times, and was felt to enhance spirituality during sacred rites. The oil has a rich and warm, woody yet bittersweet scent which is pleasant to use during meditation. We offer a premium quality Myrrh, and a more cost-efficient selection from India that is softer and sweeter, to cover your product needs.
Most aromatherapy oil based blends will be between 1 and 5 percent dilutions, which typically does not represent a safety concern. As one increases dilution, potential dermal (skin) reactions may take place depending on the individual essential oil, the area in which the oil is applied, and other factors related to the client’s own sensitivity levels. Any excessive usage of essential oils may cause irritation or other undesired effects due to their lipophilic nature.5

In many industries (healthcare, agriculture, etc., as you are probably very familiar), there are Independent Certification Bodies, Accreditation Services, that are generally not-for-profit and independent—watchdogs who make sure that what companies say is happening is actually happening.  With every certification there are specific parameters that the product must meet: So for instance, in the US, the USDA sets the standards for organic agriculture, and any certifying bodies must be approved by the USDA to be credible. This system creates multiple levels of independent evaluation—and a company can't just claim that its products are organic, at least on packaging, unless it's been certified so by this system of certification. 
This kind of statement has always left me scratching my head. Sometimes it is also stated as “….EOs are the most OXYGENATED substances on earth.” Whether its meant to be OXYGENATING or OXYGENATED the statement is just plain wrong. Yes essential oils contain oxygen but that doesn’t equate to be “oxygenating” or the “most oxygenated.” Those of you taking my Chemistry of Essential Oils course already know that, 99+% of the time, when we are talking about essential oil molecules, we are concerned only with 3 elements of the periodic table: Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen. The molecules in essential oils are mainly mono and sesquiterpenes and their oxygenated derivatives. Essential oils are volatile organic liquids. There are absolutely NO HORMONES (at least not human hormones) OR VITAMINS in essential oils. In addition, of these 3 most common EO elements, Oxygen is the LEAST frequently occurring. If you are just counting types of atoms in the essential oil molecules, Hydrogen is the most prevalent atom followed by Carbon, then Oxygen (again just counting numbers of atoms, not a weight comparison). A large percentage of all essential oil molecules are hydrocarbons (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and don’t even contain Oxygen at all. When the molecules do contain Oxygen, the ratio typically ranges from 1 or 2 atoms of Oxygen to say 10 to 17 atoms of Carbon and 18 to 26 atoms of Hydrogen (for the most common cases of oxygenated mono and sesquiterpenes). Furthermore, the Oxygen in essential oil molecules is BOUND OXYGEN not really available to be delivered in the form of free oxygen radical or oxygen molecules (of course there an infinitesimal amount of dissolved oxygen molecules in just about any liquid but this is insignificant) and thus not very “oxygenating.” It is still unclear to me what the basis for these claims concerning essential oils are coming from and would love to know the literature sources that the claimants are citing as their support. I could go on more about this topic but Robert Tisserand has already written an excellent response to the “Oxygenating” myth on his website, so rather than re-invent the wheel I will refer all of you to read his comments there.
I started using oils about 3 months ago. I put a couple of drops of lemon in my water and drink it, use peppermint and citrus oils for aromatherapy energy bombs, have started using them for cleaning, and, I just found a great deoderant recipe that works for me! I’m a fairly large woman (5’10”, 300 pounds) and I sweat a lot, but this recipe works. I use 20 drops each of lemon, frankincense, and lavender in a small roller bottle topped with melted coconut oil. My pits don’t smell at all, even after a fairly hard workout. Some people like fractionated coconut oil, and others like grape seed oil. I prefer melted coconut oil because I like a slightly thicker viscosity. Plus, if it solidifies, just shake the bottle repeatedly and it will get back to normal. For those that want a spray recipe, fill your same 20 drops of each oil into a 3 oz spray bottle and then top it off with witch hazel.
Thanks for the informative article on essential oils! I want to know if there are any essential oils that can be applied on my skin (face) just before my skin is exposed to direct sunlight? I know that the skin where citrus oils are applied should not be exposed to direct sunlight for few hours after application. That’s the only question that I am concerned with because I am very interested in concocting a facial oil moisturizer after reading an article of yours that is about making a “3-ingredient facial oil moisturizer”.
I've been digging into this for over a year now, beginning last summer when I noticed a new multi-level essential oil company sweep into my social media feeds. What struck my curiosity at first was less about the oils and more about the controversy that seemed to surround them - the lawsuits, accusations and most important to me, questions being raised about quality.
So, as you can see, it would be impossible to characterize an essential oil or even a single essential oil molecule as having a single vibrational energy frequency. Furthermore, the energy of vibration in molecules is way higher than the 52 Mhz – 320 MHz (52,000,000 – 320,000,000 Hertz) range claimed by the people selling the eo frequency measuring devices. In fact, that low energy range would be in the radio waves region and below.
Thank you Holly! I’m happy to see someone stand up and clarify the fact that doTerra does stand behind their oils. To state such a statement of an oil to 100% certified pure therapeutic grade does mean something….especially is you consider using them internally or for cooking. If you are considering using essential oils instead of over the counter drugs, which contain many chemical ingredients (by the way, they use the same plants to create their drugs only they change them chemically and add other things), why not go all the way and eliminate ALL toxic and chemical additions to your body?? My suggestion, do your homework and research! Don’t take someone’s word for it in a comment. Buy a few bottles of the same oil (I hope you’ll consider doTerra) and compare how you feel.
Thank you so much for posting this. I had a reaction to my pure, therapeutic grade Frankincense on my skin and it left me with an itchy rash for over a week. It left me really wondering about the claims the MLM supporters make. I have had great experience in using my oils, but it is foolish to claim they can do no harm. I really appreciate a scientist’s take on all of this.

Great article! I like the way everything is explained in detail. I love essential oils and use few kinds for aromatherapy, but the thing I always wanted to do is to include essential oils in my homemade cleaning solutions. In your article I found all the information and advices I needed, so now I already can use essential oils for cleaning too. Thank you for the hints!
One thing I wonder though (couldn’t find it on the websites you listed either) – My grandmother loves the smell of tomato leaves and I ran across a hand cream that was tomato leaf scented once when I was overseas but it was too much liquid to bring home. Is there somewhere I can find an essential oil or make one or something like it to make a nice handcream for her?

First, their bottles didn’t come with the little plastic dripper caps that cover the mouth of the bottle (aka. orifice reducer), they just had a simple screw cap. Without the orifice reducers you either have to pour the oil out and make a mess or dip an eye dropper into the oil which can potentially contaminate the product if you’re not careful. Plus if oil gets into the little rubber bulb of the eye dropper it can get stuck in there and go bad, further contaminating the oil.

A 2009 report from an ophthalmologist in Bristol UK, describes partial loss of corneal tissue (ie erosion) when a 73-year-old man dripped Olbas Oil into his left eye (he had no right eye) because he thought he was using eye drops (see picture above). He was “considerably incapacitated”, but recovered after a week of treatment with “topical antibiotics and lubricants”. On checking, the author found that just his hospital, in the previous 18 months, had seen 12 patients who had mistakenly dripped Olbas Oil into one eye. He describes the result as a chemical burn, though he found that Olbas Oil in tears was pH neutral (most chemical burns are caused by substances that are strongly acid or alkaline). All “Olbas Oil patients” recovered fully within one week following intensive treatment (Adams et al 2009).
As far as I can tell, ‘wintergreen oil’ is not listed anywhere by the FDA. Methyl salicylate IS permitted by the FDA as an indirect food additive, when is is a constituent of an adhesive. It is not on their ‘regular’ indirect food additive list – only the one that applies to adhesives. But I can’t see it on any negative list, and I can’t see a maximum permitted amount.
Dr. Pappas is the President/Technical Director at Essential Oil University. Founded in 1999 by Dr. Robert S. Pappas, EOU is an educational/informational institution dedicated to essential oil production, chemistry and uses and has the largest online database for essential oil chemistry in the world. Dr. Pappas is also an adjunct Professor at Indiana University. Dr. Pappas work has made him a much-sought-after consultant for companies and individuals all over the world because the information he provides helps with quality assurance and with learning how an essential oil might be useful. Dr. Pappas created the Facebook page Essential Oil University which is dedicated spreading accurate information concerning essential oils and dispelling the myths that have been hyped over the years.
To date, there has been no company or organization that certifies essential oils. The MOA was established to fill this need. Companies who wish to have an independent organization test the quality of their oils for ISO compliance can contact the MOA to conduct independent testing and certification. Companies who pass these tests can then proudly state that their essential oil is of ISO quality and therefore is a true “Medicinal Grade” oil. Ethical companies will use this standard in their marketing literature. Oils produced only for fragrance need not apply.

Here is a list from one hospital of what they use the oils for:We regularly treat gout, neuropathy, carpel tunnel, sinusitis, headaches, abdominal pain, kidney stone pain, neuralgia, tennis elbow, arthritis, back pain, leg cramps, post-op hip and knee pain and whatever else comes our way. Each patient’s need, including which Young Living Essential Oils were used, is documented in our electronic charting so we can track their outcomes. We always have a good stock of Young Living lavender, peppermint, Peace and Calming, lemongrass, Thieves and plenty of single oils to make blends for gout.
However, a small variation in price differences on the higher end will NOT mean a better essential oil. It will just mean a higher price. (A little birdie also told me that there are also only a handful of essential oil distilleries in the world, which means that most essential oils come from the exact same places – thus there is little difference in quality between the more “typically priced” EOs.) What I’m saying here is: Understand that you DO have to pay for quality, but that if you’re just using essential oils in non-therapeutic fashions, it’s okay to use less expensive oils (like the Beeyoutiful ones pictured at the top of this post, or NOW brand essential oils). But if you want high quality, I suggest using an ethical supplier that offers organic essential oils (grown without pesticides or toxic fertilizers).
There is also an argument from YL distributors that their oils come from the best crops in the world. As they grow their own crops and only use their own, not sure how they can claim it’s unarguably the best in the world. Every crop is different. Only sampling every crop, every batch would support that claim. Anyway, I am not a qualified aromatherapist either but my research suggests that YL oils and their advice might be best to avoid.
I just wanted to correct you, when you say that essential oils should not be taken internally. This is one huge difference, and deciding factor for how I select an essential oil. If I can’t eat it, I won’t use it on my skin. Anything your skin contacts, goes to your blood stream. If an oil is unsafe for consumption, you should not use it. Many oils like peppermint, wintergreen, basil, lemon, lavender, clove, etc. are great for problems like headache, nausea, indigestion, pain, flu, and other ailments. One drop under the tongue, or mixed with a teaspoonbof honey is a great way to get fast releif and healing properties to your cells without harm. This is why the brand does matter. The extraction method is very important and has everything to do with the grade of oil in the end result. Not all oils are created equal, that’s for sure. Young Living is the brand I use and trust.
This is the biggest and most hotly argued aspect of the unregulated essential oil market. Be aware, there are no official legal bindings to the terms, “Pure”, “100% Pure”, “Natural”, and “Therapeutic Grade”; in fact there are no grades at all regarding essential oils. If you see any of these, or similar terms on essential oils, they are completely meaningless marketing slogans.
I am all new to this, so don’t judge to hard. I am wondering if ESSENTIAL OILS HELP WITH PAIN/SORENESS? For example, getting leg cramps in the middle of the night where it wakes you up from a dead sleep and all you can think of doing is walking it off and then the aftermath soreness is still there gets quite aggravating after about the first two times. Being a semi non believer in pills, I’m looking for alternatives. Would essential oils be something that would help in this particular situation? If so, any recommendations? THANKS IN ADVANCE!
If a bottle states not for ingestion or internal use, you should put the bottle down and walk away because there are toxic chemicals in it. You CAN and SHOULD be able to ingest your oils and is exactly why you should ONLY use therapeutic grade E.O’s. Things that go on your skin become absorbed into your bloodstream just the same as if you take it internally but it by passes the digestion process which means its even more important to make sure whatever you put on your skin is pesticide free, chemical free and natural.
I have to give an honest review for this. I have spent one full week spending hours trying to search for the "best" essential oils to use especially that I am just a beginner. I read so much about the top brands like doTarra, and Young living etc, but also read great stuff about this brand which is not as popular. I decided to give it a try 4 things to mention

Which brings me to Young Loving. Sigh. I really LOVE their oils. They have a clarity that I just don’t find, reliably, from any other company that I have tried. I did the whole kit and membership thing but only for my own needs. I’m not here to sell anybody anything. I use a lot of their other products as well and have been happy with my purchases (except for the Rose Ointment that has Patchouli in it. I hate Patchouli).


Standardized oils are those which have been altered from their naturally balanced state. They can be adulterated with all natural constituents. An example of this would be Lavender. True Lavender is Lavandula angustifolia. Most of the flowers and oil from France are actually a cross between Lavandula angustifolia and Lavandula latifolia and should more properly be referred to as Lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia). Additionally, Lavandin essential oil may be combined with chemical constituents of Lavender or other species, such as linalyl acetate from Mentha citrata, for example, to produce a Lavender 40-42 essential oil, a 40 to 42% standardization of linalyl acetate and linalool content. This oil is most widely presented as a Lavender oil but is not acceptable in the practice of Aromatherapy.
I personally have a number of Aura Cacia's oils that I bought prior to really digging into oils.  I can't say anything except for my personal experience which is that they don't smell as potent as some of the other oils that I have.  I do like the company and I purchase from Frontier Co op regularly, but I'm not choosing to get my oils from them.   That being said, I think that they have a lot of great information about oils and their use.
I’m wondering.. I was thinking about trying the oil cleansing method (I have grapeseed oil and sunflower oil in my cabinet) and I was considering adding lemon essential oil just to see what it does and I read in this post not to use lemon if you’re nursing…why is that? I can’t imagine that lemon would hurt. Especially since I would just be putting a drop or two on my face, not drinking large quantities (I know, not possible, but I threw it out there as a referential visual lol). But yes, I’m never happy when I see “do not use” or “consult a medical professional” when breastfeeding on just about every product out there but none of them ever say why.. I’m very interested in the why’s of things, if you could help answer this one for me 🙂 thanks!
I’m not sure what you mean when you say “gras” but I wouldn’t recommend using just any essential oil, especially when you are putting it in your mouth. American standards only require 2% essential oils in a bottle that is labeled “100% Pure”. It’s really unfortunate we have such lax standards. Be Young uses the International standards for essential oil purity (E.O.B.B.D.)
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To find a therapeutic grade essential oil you will need to know its latin name and find it back on the bottle. The bottle also needs to have the name and address of the aupplier and a batch number. It is really not advised to use less than therapeutic grade in any skin, beauty or healthcare products as you are so much more likely to get adverse effects.
I'm updating this post years later to add important information. I do not have all of the information in this series on why I didn't choose certain companies so I would appreciate you not accusing me of coming to silly conclusions. I have gotten threatening emails (some of they cryptic threats), and have been warned about being sued if I published certain things.
Balsam of Peru, an essential oil derived from the Myroxylon, is used in food and drink for flavoring, in perfumes and toiletries for fragrance, and in medicine and pharmaceutical items for healing properties.[33][unreliable source?] However, a number of national and international surveys have identified Balsam of Peru as being in the "top five" allergens most commonly causing patch test allergic reactions in people referred to dermatology clinics.[34][35][36]
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