Organic essential oils are not only good for sustainable agricultural practices, they also have the greatest healing properties, says Josh Axe, D.N.M, C.N.S., D.C. founder of DrAxe.com, best-selling author of Eat Dirt, and co-founder of Ancient Nutrition. “Having nothing else added in during the extraction process is the only way to guarantee they are unprocessed and sourced directly from the plant,” says Dr. Axe. Organic is definitely more expensive than conventionally grown, but you’re also getting a superior essential oil.
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In mainstream medicine, often called allopathic, rational or Western medicine, doctors use drugs primarily to alleviate symptoms. In this approach, the core problem is seen as the symptoms. The disease symptoms are viewed as the target and locus of treatment and a treatment is chosen to directly address the symptoms on the physical level. Success is measured by the slowing or remission of the disease or by the reduction of symptoms in the body.
Anyway, I found a local store that makes (distills?) their own. I enjoy going there to pick out and purchase my oils. Plus I love to support my community. However, I’m still stuck on the idea of food grade. My local place says their EOs are not food grade and shouldn’t be ingested. So do those MLMs do something to their oils to make them safe to consume or is my local place just saying that to cover their butts?
You’ll often see companies advertising their "therapeutic grade," "aromatherapy grade," or "medicinal grade" oils. Unfortunately for them, no such thing exists. "There is no formally approved grading standard used consistently throughout the essential oil industry," Lortscher says. Simply put, anyone who says that they have therapeutic grade or "certified" essential oils is lying. "That seal is nothing more than a commercial trademark. It isn’t backed by any scientific body."

Sorry to disappoint but essential oils are not alive. I would like to see anyone go through a 212+ degree distillation process for a few hours and come out alive on the other end! The plant material is certainly not alive after the distillation so I am not sure how anyone could believe that the oil is alive. Essential oils are a collection of volatile organic molecules, not living entities. Furthermore, since they themselves are not alive, the oils do not give life to anything (but this is not to say they don’t help the plant survive). Lets just look at this logically and break it down. In order for A to give life to B, it follows that A must predate B in its timeline of existence. This is not the case for essential oils. Plants don’t start producing essential oils until a certain point in their development. The oil does not give life to the plant, the plant, at some point, starts producing the oil.
No, at least they shouldn’t have any preservatives. Think of essential oils like the essence of a plant or flower. To have them last they should come in a colored bottle (brown or blue) and be stored out of sunlight. You only use a small bit so that balances the cost. Keep the lids on the bottles and they’ll be fine. Nothing lasts forever (well, I take that back. Honey may just last forever).
The primary constituents are listed, but not in any proportion and I haven’t the foggiest what specific gravity, refractive index, or optical rotation levels are appropriate for what I’m doing (natural perfumery). Steffen Arctander’s “Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin” is a big help overall, but I was wondering if you could comment on this.
In answer to your daughters eczema problem, I am a first time mother of an 8 month old. I just took her to an herbalist because I thought she had a rash and he told me it was eczema. She started out with it on her leg and within a couple weeks in spread all over her torso. He suggested I start giving her “Kali sulph” It is a homeopathic remedy used for various skin conditions. He recommended I give her two tablets three times per day. That was two weeks ago and there has been a significant change in her eczema! I do not know much about essential oils though I full heartedly believe they work but I am just a mom wanting to help another mom. I hope you find something for your daughter.
CBD is short for cannabidiol which is a compound found in the marijuana plant. The other compound that most people are more familiar with is THC, which is what classifies marijuana as a psychoactive drug. CBD DOES NOT contain the side effects of THC. For years, the effect of CBD oil for inflammation, fibromyalgia, and depression has been studied by medical experts. Though CBD ointment for pain has been used for centuries, studies have shown that the chemical compound found in cannabidiol can benefit those suffering from many different ailments.

The Medicinal Oil Association (MOA) was founded to be an independent quality control regulating body for the essential oil industry. It was founded by Dr Jed Adamson ND and Dr Tracy Gibbs PhD. The popularity of and wide spread use of essential oils is similar to the growth of the dietary supplement industry in the early 1990’s but today, just as then, there is no regulatory body to determine safety, purity or misuse of essential oils.

To be an international help for consumer, the BDIH works together with five other organisations for natural cosmetic from France, Italy, Belgium and Great Britain to harmonise the different national standards. The result is the European Cosmos Standard which makes the standards and comparability. The national labels remain so the consumers recognize them.


Great article! I like the way everything is explained in detail. I love essential oils and use few kinds for aromatherapy, but the thing I always wanted to do is to include essential oils in my homemade cleaning solutions. In your article I found all the information and advices I needed, so now I already can use essential oils for cleaning too. Thank you for the hints!

When working with children ALWAYS dilute the ois moderately to heavily. If it says 1:4 dilution meaning 1 drop of EO to 4 drops of carrier then you want to double or triple it for the child. Do your research – you can use most oils in children of all ages provided you dilute them properly. My DD had immunizations not too long ago and I used moderately diluted lavender, heavily diluted lemon, and heavily diluted peppermint to combat the fever she had and some Heavily diluted Panaway which is a YL blend to control the pain. They worked wonderfully and she was a happy camper by that evening. The next day which is typically the worst she was her normal self and you couldn’t tell that she had been given shots the day before.


Partly true. If an essential oil is distilled at too high a temperature, too low a temperature, or for too long, this *can* increase the concentration of toxic components or artifacts. But to say that *any* improperly distilled component is toxic is simply not true. Toxicity is not determined by whether a substance is a genuine essential oil constituent. Toxic constituents can also be formed during normal distillation, hydrocyanic acid (“cyanide”) being the classic example – in bitter almond oil.
“Organic” and “Wild Crafted” are just labels that have limited meanings when it comes to actual purity and therapeutic properties of the oil and sustainability of the source. Just because a plant is grown under organic conditions doesn’t mean that it’s pure or at therapeutic levels once its oil is put into a bottle. Organic only means the plant is grown without synthetic pesticides, chemical fertilizers, etc. The testing that most EO companies do only tests to ensure that certain required constituents are present in the oil and does not test for things that shouldn’t be there (ie weeds which can also be organic) or test that the constituents which are present are actually at therapeutic levels. That’s where it’s important to have 3rd party tests and that the results are certified (meaning that I can take that bottle of oil to a chemist and have it tested and it will be exactly what the company says it is and what I expect I paid for). Also the label “wild crafted” only means that the plant was grown in the wild. Again, it doesn’t ensure purity or potency of the oil. Also, being wild crafted doesn’t guarantee the oil comes from a plant that was sustainably grown and harvested. Many illegal cuttings are causing the extinction of plants in some regions. doTERRA’s certification of their oils to be 100% pure (nothing in them but the oil of the plant intended and no weeds organic or otherwise or anything else) and at therapeutic levels, backed up by 3rd party testing, means they put their reputation on the line that every bottle of their oils can be tested anywhere by anybody and what’s in the bottle will be exactly what they say it is; only what they say it is and at the therapeutic levels they say it is. So the question is, why do all other EO companies NOT certify their oils to be 100% pure and at therapeutic levels?
After dong much research and reading many reviews. Native American nutritional’s is the choice of most that use essential oils commercially. Do terra is 2nd and young living is right up there. Most professional’s don’t even want to touch young living and other pyramid marketing companies. A friend sells young living so I did get a bottle of valor from her. I have a variety of brands that i found through research just to try them. From what I’ve read, young living and doterra are so expensive because of how they are marketed. Not because they are superior.

One unpleasant—but totally effective—parallel you’d find in nature is poison ivy: We react to poison ivy with those awful, itchy-as-all-get-out red bumps because we’re exposed to an active compound in the plant that interacts with our skin. Elizabeth Trattner, M.D., explains that essential oils work differently—but they’re even stronger. "Essential oils can be up to 100 times more potent than the plant itself," she says. "So their effects are visible with just a few drops."
I am new to essential oils. I just purchased a diffuser and Callily essential oils sampler pak. I’m following all directions for the diffuser, and adding 3–5 drops of oil, but I really cannot even smell them! I was hoping to use the eucalyptus for my sinuses at night, but sadly I’m getting no benefits or noticing anything healing. Any advice from anyone? It says do not overuse oils in diffuser, but I feel like I need to add more to actually smell them in the air! Thanks for any advice!
NOW Foods runs an in-house full facility laboratory and utilizes third party testing only when necessary. They do put their oils through Gas Chromatography (GC) testing and Infrared Spectometry. A selection of their assortment are USDA certified organic essential oils, and their oils are natural and 100% pure. One jasmine blend is clearly labeled as synthetic, but it is the only one in their assortment and the reason is explained on NOW’s essential oils FAQ page here, basically justifying the synthetic scent due to the very high price of pure jasmine oil.

To test if you’re sensitive to an essential oil (which is probably best to do before using it in a skincare preparation): Combine one drop of essential oil with 1/2 tsp carrier oil (like olive, jojoba, or sweet almond). Rub this on the inside, upper portion of your arm and wait a few hours. If no redness or itching develops, you’re most likely not sensitive to that essential oil.

In the follow up email that I received, it stated that they have never found any adulteration in their oils, that perhaps a compound of the oil was misidentified, and that they couldn't contact the lab that had done the testing and shown adulteration because they are located in France. I know they speak French in France, but they do have phones and email.
From what I have read on various websites and blogs there is no such thing as “therapeutic grade” since there is no system in place in this country to determine the grade of an essential oil. Since any brand of essential oils can be used for aromatherapy then all essential oils would technically be therapeutic grade since aroma therapy is a therapeutic use of essential oils.
Essential oils are all the rage. You know the ones I’m talking about. In fact, you’ve probably been invited to a product party where little vials with expensive price tags promise a wide range of health benefits. You’ve also heard the stories. Essential oils cure warts and ear infections. They soothe rashes and bellyaches. They reduce fever and fight the common cold. Virtually any ailment you suffer has a corresponding dose of liquid magic.
Because of email disclaimers, I cannot share the response I received without infringement. What I can say is that the company responded quickly, and included a proclamation from an apparent "third party expert". I sent this to an essential oil expert I have worked with and trust who confirmed that much of it was fancy language to confuse consumers, but it didn't respond to the query of whether a batch of their oils had been contaminated and what is being done to ensure this is no longer happening.

Thank you for asking this question! I have spent countless hours researching this very question, and have even contacted Young Living to get their response, all to no avail! I feel like someone is not being honest, and while I want to just go with YL, the fact that at first they didn’t respond and when the finally did (through a consultant who was on a live chat), the response was vague. It just makes me question if there is corruption in the EO industry like so many others. Would LOVE for someone to respond to this question!
Greetings! I'm Wendy Robbins, the founder, curator and writer for AromaWeb. I've been working with essential oils for nearly 25 years, have completed over 400 documented hours of education in the field of aromatherapy, am a Certified Aromatherapist and am a Professional Level Member of both the Alliance of International Aromatherapists and the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy. Learn more about my background and credentials.

Essential oils have long been used for enhancing the flavor of food and are commonly used internally for their therapeutic purposes. However, I must stress that anyone who recommends the oral use of essential oils for therapeutic purposes should be suitably qualified. This means that they should have suitable training in physiology, pharmacology and aromatherapy chemistry and should have a minimum level diploma qualification in aromatic medicine or a medical herbalism diploma.
something else I found that kills bedbugs, and their eggs ON CONTACT is rubbing alcohol. I had a mild infestation from a bed frame I got from someone, and I kept a spray bottle of rubbing alcohol by the bed. I sprayed all the parts of the bed before bringing it in the house, but somehow missed some. I would spray the wood liberally every night before bed, down in the crevices, as much as I could, and also spray them directly whenever I would see one. They were gone in a matter of days.
Exposure to essential oils may cause a contact dermatitis.[20][21][22] Essential oils can be aggressive toward rubbers and plastics, so care must be taken in choosing the correct handling equipment. Glass syringes are often used, but have coarse volumetric graduations. Chemistry syringes are ideal, as they resist essential oils, are long enough to enter deep vessels, and have fine graduations, facilitating quality control. Unlike traditional pipettes, which have difficulty handling viscous fluids, the chemistry syringe, also known as a positive displacement pipette, has a seal and piston arrangement which slides inside the pipette, wiping the essential oil off the pipette wall.
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